Lululemon forecasts revenue growth in low teens for next 5 years doubling

first_img Twitter Comment Reuters Email More Reddit advertisement Sponsored By: Lululemon forecasts revenue growth in low teens for next 5 years, doubling menswear Also plans to quadruple revenue from international markets with expansion across China, the Asia Pacific and Europe, Middle East and Africa regions Share this storyLululemon forecasts revenue growth in low teens for next 5 years, doubling menswear Tumblr Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn April 24, 20198:21 AM EDT Filed under News Retail & Marketing center_img Recommended For YouU.S. crude oil stockpiles drop amid Barry, fuel posts large builds – EIABoeing to spend $50 million to support 737 MAX crash victim familiesLatam stocks dip on U.S.-China trade jitters; Currencies riseOhio Senate to vote on bill to save state’s nuclear power plantsBulgaria steps up measures to prevent spread of African swine fever Canadian yoga-pants specialists Lululemon Athletica Inc on Wednesday forecast annual revenue growth in the low teens for the next five years.Lululemon, which has been focusing on menswear, expects to more than double the size of its revenue from the business segment by 2023.The push into menswear comes as Nike Inc, the world’s largest sportswear maker, goes in the opposite direction, targeting Lululemon’s core female audience with its own line of yoga wear, launched at the end of last year.Lululemon also plans to quadruple its revenue from international markets in the five years by focusing on expanding across China, the Asia Pacific and Europe, Middle East and Africa regions.The 21-year old company, founded in Vancouver, expects operating income growth to exceed revenue growth annually, and modest gross margin expansion, it said in a statement ahead of its investor day on Wednesday.However, Lululemon said it expects its core women’s business to generate revenue growth in the low double digits per annum for the next five years.Shares of Lululemon trade at 37.05 times of its 12 month forward earnings estimate, making them more expensive than peers. Nike Inc trades at 29.36 times and Adidas AG trades at 23.15 times. © Thomson Reuters 2019 Featured Stories ← Previous Next → A customer looks at athletic apparel inside a Lululemon Athletica Inc. store at the International Finance Centre mall in Hong Kong, China.Xaume Olleros/Bloomberg Join the conversation → Facebook What you need to know about passing the family cottage to the next generation 0 Commentslast_img read more

WatchDown to Business podcast Why Canadas second biggest burger chain took a

first_img 2 Comments Down to Business podcast: How Canada’s largest sports company is grappling with digital disruption Down to Business podcast: The real culprit behind Vancouver’s runaway real estate Down to Business podcast: Why the Canada-China trade relationship is making Canadian businesses uneasy If you have any questions about the show, or if there are topics you want us to tackle, email us: downtobusiness@postmedia.com. June 5, 20197:16 AM EDT Filed under News Retail & Marketing Recommended For You$2 billion payout to couple who said they got cancer from the weedkiller Roundup is warning on lawsuits to comeKinder Morgan Posts second-quarter profit but misses expectations; shares drop two per centSNC-Lavalin shares surge on hopes of new boss and new strategyAlternative lenders gain ground as mortgage originations slow: CMHCEni officials approached witness to withdraw statements in Nigeria case – prosecutor More Twitter Emily Jackson Email Down to Business podcast: Why Canada’s second biggest burger chain took a chance on Beyond Meat Episode 7 of the weekly podcast from the Financial Post Facebook Comment Welcome to Down to Business, a weekly podcast from the Financial Post.Our seventh episode covers A&W breaking new ground with Beyond Meat. Susan Senecal, president and CEO of A&W Canada, joins host Emily Jackson to talk about why her chain was the first national fast-food restaurant to introduce Beyond Meat burgers, and why she thinks the plant-based protein trend is here to stay.You can listen below — or on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher and Google Play, where you can also subscribe to get new episodes every Wednesday morning. Reddit Share this storyDown to Business podcast: Why Canada’s second biggest burger chain took a chance on Beyond Meat Tumblr Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn Join the conversation →last_img read more

ExInfiniti Boss Pegged For Dysons Electric Car Program

first_img Dyson Working On Three Electric Cars, Not Just One Dyson To Build 10 Miles Of Electric Car Test Track Source: Electric Vehicle News Dyson Electric Car To Be Built In Singapore Starting In 2021 Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on January 23, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News Former Infiniti president Roland Krueger will officially head up Dyson’s automotive division.Dyson CEO Jim Rowan has substantiated news that his company hired Krueger for the new position. Krueger spent the last three years leading Nissan’s luxury marque: Infiniti. However, he left recently to move on to new opportunities. So, perhaps this position with Dyson has been in the works for some time.Additional Dyson Electric Car Coverage: Rowan is excited to bring Krueger on board for the project, with plans to launch an electric vehicle in 2021. According to Autocar, Rowan revealed the information during a recent financial meeting. He referred to Krueger as a: … very well respected and experienced executive within the industry, and his appointment proves how serious we are about taking this project and this division to the next level.The CEO also explained that Dyson has plans to pump over $1 billion into its electric car efforts in 2019. He said that Dyson’s supply chain experience and expertise will allow the company to make a profit producing EVs. Dyson will build its cars at a new factory in Singapore, and will relocate its primary office there as well. Aside from the fact that the company already has established business and 1,110 employees in Singapore, Rowan points out:Singapore also offers access to high-growth markets as well as an extensive supply chain and a highly skilled workforce. Singapore has a comparatively high cost base, but also great technology expertise and focus. It is therefore the right place to make high-quality technology-loaded machines, and the right place to make our electric vehicle.According to the company, we should expect Dyson electric vehicle prototypes to surface some time next year, with solid-state battery technology.Source: Autocarlast_img read more

Hyundai debuts 70passenger electric doubledecker bus

first_imgHyundai introduced its first all-electric double-decker bus today as the company aims to reduce traffic congestion and air pollution. more…Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and subscribe to the podcast.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V1zk7Eb8r-s&list=PL_Qf0A10763mA7Byw9ncZqxjke6Gjz0MtThe post Hyundai debuts 70-passenger electric double-decker bus appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img

Spot On Observations Regarding The Telefonica Brasil Enforcement Action

first_imgPrevious posts here and here discussed the SEC’s recent Foreign Corrupt Practices Act enforcement action against Telefonica Brasil (focused on the company hosting Brazilian officials at soccer matches in Brazil) as well as the many problematic issues associated with the expansive enforcement action.The most recent edition of the always informative FCPA Update by Debevoise & Plimpton likewise takes issue which various aspects of the enforcement action. Kara Brockmeyer (the SEC’s former FCPA Unit Chief) is the lead author of the spot on article which states in pertinent part:“The Telefonica Order is reminiscent of the SEC’s 2015 Cease-and-Desist Order against BHP Billiton (the “BHP Order”), which found similar violations in connection with the 2008 Beijing Olympics.6 As with the BHP Order, the Telefonica Order raises questions about what controls the SEC expects regarding corporate hospitality expenditures. It also provides yet another example of the SEC’s virtually strict liability approach to enforcement of the FCPA’s accounting provisions.[…]The Telefonica Order raises questions regarding corporate hospitality similar to those that stemmed from the BHP Order, and unfortunately answers none of them. Corporate hospitality is defined in the Oxford English Dictionary as “[t]he entertaining of clients by companies in order to promote business, especially at sporting or other public events.” Such gatherings are ubiquitous at major sporting events such as the World Cup and the Olympics. The practice benefits both business and the sporting events themselves, and even is reflected in the architecture of many sporting venues in the form of luxury boxes.The legitimate business purpose of corporate hospitality is, among other things, what Telefonica sought: to build relationships. “Informal settings at sports events [are] better suited to networking than formal roundtable dinners.”As one industry executive described: “In today’s uber-connected world of smartphones and social media, salespeople and executives are in need of actual face time with their clients and an exciting experience at a sporting event . . . is an ideal way to make that happen.”The established nature of corporate hospitality also has been recognized in the anti-corruption context, including as part of the U.K. Ministry of Justice’s Guidance to the Bribery Act. Then Lord Chancellor Kenneth Clarke specifically noted in the forward to the Guidance that “no one wants to stop firms getting to know their clients by taking them to events like Wimbledon or the Grand Prix.”Unlike the UK, the SEC has provided no such comfort regarding such practices, including two settled enforcement actions in the last four years. In thinking about corporate hospitality that the SEC or other regulators may scrutinize, we note the brief examples contained in the Resource Guide to the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. In context, the SEC and DOJ considered as reasonable certain entertainment, for example “a baseball game and a play,” but not junkets with little or no business purpose, for example “an all expenses paid week-long trip to Las Vegas.” Guidance on where the Olympics, World Cup, or any similar event falls on the spectrum of appropriate corporate hospitality would be beneficial. A comparison of the Telefonica and BHP Orders highlights key questions left unanswered by the SEC.What are the legitimate goals of corporate hospitality? The Telefonica Order quotes the internal approval for the purchase of World Cup tickets as being “for relationship-building activities with strategic audiences.” Similarly, the BHP Order describes the stated goals of the BHP Olympic hospitality as “to reinforce and develop relationships with key stakeholders” and “to build relationships with stakeholders from product and investor markets, and regions where we have or would like to have operations.” Does the SEC consider these stated goals to be illegitimate? If not, why were they quoted in the orders, and what was the specific “improper purpose” underlying these actions? Ultimately, is the SEC implying that any benefits conveyed to government officials as corporate hospitality are improper if the issuer seeks an advantage in the relationship with the government official or agency involved? Alternatively, is the SEC making narrower points regarding the adequacy of internal accounting controls and the separate and express recording of such hospitality in an issuer’s books and records?How important is the distinction between gifts and hospitality?Telefonica and BHP both dealt with “hospitality program[s].” However, the Telefônica Order confuses the issue by focusing on (and repeatedly referring to) “tickets and related hospitality,” while elsewhere referring just to tickets “provided to” or “given to” government officials. By focusing on the tickets as the thing that was provided to government officials, the SEC conflates gifts and hospitality. In this case, since the tickets were part of corporate hospitality, they were not “gifts” as that term is generally understood. As described above, corporate hospitality involves sharing an experience and has a clear and legitimate business purpose of relationship building. Gifts, on the other hand, lack the “shared” element. As a technical matter, these considerations matter more for the anti-bribery provisions of the FCPA (which were not at issue in either order), but the SEC’s failure to distinguish the two further muddles an issue already lacking in clarity.When is an invitation inappropriate? In the BHP Order, the SEC identified four specific officials who were invited to the Olympics and were in a position to make decisions regarding specific, substantial, and imminent business as examples of failures in BHP’s internal controls. The Telefonica Order provides no such specificity. It states that the guests included “individuals who were significant to the company’s business interests,” mentions that Telefonica took “into account the importance of the actions that each guest has already effectively done in our favor,” and includes quotes without context regarding a guest “who has opened many doors” or whose help a Telefonica employee would need, or who has given “ongoing support.” Without further guidance, it remains unclear at what point an official is sufficiently removed from a company’s business that the official can be invited to a soccer match.What about family and guests? The Telefonica Order notes in passing that “in some cases, more than one ticket was given to an official so he or she could invite friends or family members.” The BHP Order referred to invited spouses on numerous occasions and found fault with BHP’s lack of guidance as to how invitations to spouses should be assessed under BHP’s procedures. The examples in the Guidance also specifically note that paying expenses for officials’ spouses “appear[] to be designed to corruptly curry favor with [] foreign government officials.” The SEC apparently espouses the view that inviting family members along undermines any legitimate business purpose to the trip. At the same time, given the experiential nature of corporate hospitality, there are times when invitations to family members might be justified, but should be made with extreme caution.Does location matter? The Telefonica Order does not specify what the hospitality included. However, as far as can be gleaned from the Telefonica Order, the hospitality was offered by a Brazilian company, to residents of Brazil, at sporting venues in Brazil. The BHP Order involved “three to four day hospitality packages includ[ing] event tickets, luxury hotel accommodations, meals, other hospitality, and in many instances offers of business-class airfare.” Though a significant number of earlier travel and hospitality cases focused on international travel, the SEC does not appear to be distinguishing between domestic and international travel for such events, as it already suggested in 2016’s SciClone settlement. Although the Telefonica Order finds violations of only the accounting provisions, the underlying conduct involves a Brazilian company’s interactions with Brazilian government officials in Brazil. As a result, the question remains whether policing such activity is best left to local authorities, especially in countries (like Brazil) that have demonstrated the ability to monitor the ethics of their own businesses and government officials.What procedures should a company wishing to offer corporate hospitality put in place? The BHP Order described relatively elaborate screening procedures instituted by BHP, which were not always successful and with which the SEC found fault for other reasons (no independent vetting by compliance, no specialized training, no mechanism for reconsideration, and no cross checking between business groups). At the time, we suggested this was an example of the SEC excessively micromanaging compliance programs. As far as one can tell from the Telefonica Order, Telefonica had no procedures at all, which the SEC describes as a “compliance breakdown.” Setting aside the smaller penalty for Telefonica, which likely resulted from a smaller spend, the result for Telefonica was not materially different than for BHP. It is unfortunate that the SEC did not use the Telefonica Order as an occasion to offer more concrete guidance as to what controls it deems to be required.Relatedly, at what point should such procedures be triggered? Companies typically have in place approval thresholds based on spend, over which hospitality requires approval, often by a compliance or similar professional. In the BHP Order, the SEC suggested that the procedures BHP had in place were insufficient and that special screening procedures were required for expenses ranging from $12,000 to $16,000 per-person. From the Telefonica Order, it does not appear Telefonica had any controls in place, and costs were just over $3,000. At what point should companies go beyond ordinary approval procedures and adopt the more stringent screening mechanisms reflected in the BHP Order? The Telefonica Order provides no guidance. We also note that we are unaware of the SEC ever pursuing a company in connection with luxury suites at U.S. sporting events, which cost easily several hundred dollars per person. Virtual Strict Liability The Telefonica Order adds to the mounting examples of recent SEC enforcement actions charging violations of the accounting provisions unaccompanied by specific findings of bribery or “illicit” or “improper” payments. In doing so, the SEC seemingly polices behavior that it thinks may have happened (but is unwilling to state explicitly). It then crafts ad hoc internal controls under a statutory provision originally intended to broadly address “management misfeasance, misuse of corporate assets and other conduct reflecting adversely on management’s integrity.”According to the Telefonica Order, the company inadequately policed the portion of its code of ethics prohibiting gifts or hospitality “which may reward or influence a business decision.” As a result, “the company ended up offering such tickets and hospitality to government officials who were directly involved with, or in a position to influence regulatory matters, legislation, and other business.” According to the Telefônica Order, the company can be criticized legitimately for not having any controls at all (assuming such controls are actually “internal accounting controls” as specified in the statute). But the standard in Telefonica’s code of ethics, which the SEC appears to have adopted – that a company should not provide gifts or hospitality to anyone who “may reward or influence business” – is not a workable one. Government officials of the type described in the Telefonica Order are always in a position to influence “regulatory matters, legislation, and other business,” as the U.S. Supreme Court has recognized twice in rejecting the attempt to apply such a broad standard in domestic anti-corruption law. In the absence of labeling corporate hospitality bribery, the SEC would ideally articulate a workable standard against which actions by Telefonica and other companies can be measured.Likewise problematic is the conclusion of the Telefonica Order regarding the FCPA’s record-keeping provisions. It states that Telefonica improperly accounted for its purchase of World Cup and Confederations Cup tickets and related hospitality for government officials. Telefonica booked the first two installment payments for World Cup tickets as “Publicity Institutional Events” and the third installment payment, as well as the hospitality provided, as “Advertising and Publicity.” Telefonica booked the payment for the Confederations Cup tickets as “Publicity Institutional Events” and the hospitality provided as “Advertising and Publicity.”The SEC determined that, by booking expenses in this manner, Telefonica failed to “properly characterize the purchase of tickets and related hospitality that were given to government officials.” The SEC found a books and records violation seemingly because the same items (tickets and hospitality) were not characterized differently when offered to a government official. What is left unclear, however, is what the actual book-keeping failure is and exactly how the SEC believes the ticket and hospitality expenses should have been characterized. At a minimum, this approach places an undue burden on companies either to restrict severely how their corporate hospitality programs are run or to completely eliminate a legitimate business practice. If applied consistently, a pharmaceutical company that bought branded pens would have to separately account for those given to doctors in state-owned hospitals, or a business lunch would need to be broken up for accounting purposes if both private and government guests attended.”last_img read more

SCOTUS Hands Locke Lords Hastings Win in Major ForumSelection Dispute

first_imgThe U.S. Supreme Court ruled in a Texas case Tuesday that companies can use contractual agreements with other businesses to dictate the courts in specific states where disputes between the companies must be resolved. The decision is a huge win for large businesses operating in multiple states that want to litigate all their civil disputes in their home jurisdiction . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content. Remember me Lost your password? Usernamecenter_img Password Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook.last_img read more

Study finds important factors to improve transfer of patients from ICU to

first_imgThe study provides qualitative information on the experiences of patients, families and health care professionals who are involved in this high-risk health care transition.The authors note that as some participants were interviewed up to two years after the relevant ICU admission, the time elapsed may have affected their recall.”Patients, family and provider experiences with transfers from intensive care unit to hospital ward: a multi-center qualitative study” is published June 4, 2018 Jun 4 2018A new study has identified important factors that can improve the transfer of patients from the intensive care unit (ICU) to a general hospital ward, a high-risk transition in which breakdowns in communication, medical errors and adverse events resulting in readmission can occur. The research, published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) includes patient and health care provider perspectives that identify resource availability, communications and institutional culture as key factors to be addressed.”The transfer of patients from the ICU to a hospital ward is one of the most challenging, high-risk and inefficient transitions of care because the patients are among the sickest in the health care system, they are transitioning from high technological units to less acute environments, and many providers are involved in exchanges of information and responsibility,” writes Dr. Jeanna Parsons Leigh, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, with coauthors.Related StoriesStudy: Two-thirds of pneumonia patients receive more antibiotics than they probably needDanbury Hospital launches ‘Healing Hugs’ for its most vulnerable patientsHome-based support network helps stroke patients adjust after hospital dischargeThe study was conducted in 8 hospitals in 7 cities across Canada. Three broad themes emerged from consultation with patients, families and health care professionals that can hinder or improve, high-quality patient transfers: resource availability, communication and culture.Suggestions to improve patient transfers from the ICU to ward include Standardized discharge communication tools to ensure open, continuous communication between patients or families and health care providers Standardized discharge communication tools for use among health care providers Multiple forms of communication, including both verbal and written tools, to document transfer and ensure continuity of care Procedures to manage delays in transferring patients and coordinate care.center_img Source:http://www.cmaj.ca/last_img read more

Researchers develop machine learning method to predict unknown gene functions of microbes

first_imgJul 17 2018An international team led by computational biologist Fran Supek at IRB Barcelona develop a machine learning method to predict unknown gene functions of microbes.The system examines and compares ‘big data’ available on the metagenomes of human and environmental microbiomes.Understanding the functions of genes in bacteria that form part of the human microbiome—the collection of microbes found inside our bodies—is important because these genes might explain mechanisms of bacterial infection or cohabitation in the host, antibiotic resistance, or the many effects—positive and negative—that the microbiome has on human health.Surprisingly, the functions of a huge number of microbial genes are still unknown. This knowledge gap can be thought of as “genomic dark matter” in microbes, and neither computational biology nor current lab techniques have been able address this gap.This challenge has now been tackled through an international collaboration between the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) and two other interdisciplinary research centres, namely the IJS in Ljubljana (Slovenia) and RBI in Zagreb (Croatia). The findings have been published recently in Microbiome, the international journal of reference in microbiome research. The study was led by Fran Supek, computational biologist and leader of the Genome Data Science lab at IRB Barcelona, and first-authored by Vedrana Vidulin, a computer scientist affiliated to the centres in Slovenia and Croatia.Intelligent prediction methodThe researchers have developed a new computational method able to examine thousands of metagenomes simultaneously and identify the evolutionary signal that can predict the function of many microbial genes. This method, which analyses “big data” from human microbiomes (e.g. from the intestine or skin) and other metagenomes (e.g. from the soil or ocean) is based on a special kind of machine learning algorithm: it can create “decision trees” to predict hundreds of different functions at once, finding links between genes and at the same time predicting what they do in the microbial cell.”This makes the algorithm very good at not getting confused by the noise in the metagenomic data, meaning that it is accurate and can confidently propose a biological role for a large number of genes with unknown functions. Intriguingly, it also proposes many additional functions for genes that already have some known role,” says Supek.Related StoriesGene modulation goes wireless hacking the “boss gene”EMBL study reveals uncoupling between chromatin topology and gene expressionAnorexia may be as much a metabolic disorder as it is a psychiatric one, say scientistsThe most important finding to emerge from this research is that the analysis of human microbiomes and other metagenomic data, such as those of the soil and ocean, allows researchers to assign hundreds of gene functions that have evaded current computational genomics approaches until now. “In other words, metagenomes allow scientists to see what ordinary genomes don’t,” explains the Croatian researcher, who was recently awarded a grant from the European Research Council (ERC).Diversity is keyThe scientists have found that different types of environments can predict different types of gene functions. For example, metagenomes from the ocean can be used to predict the genes used by bacteria for photosynthesis. But as the researchers point out, this could not have been discovered from the bacteria in the human gut. In contrast, the gut microbiome has been very useful for predicting key genes involved in the mechanisms underlying the development of disease and in the metabolism of alcohol and the biosynthesis of certain amino acids—predictions that would have been more difficult to make using microbiomes from the environment.The authors conclude that, through machine learning, a large and diverse set of environments allows us to learn about many different gene functions in microbes. “Computational methods like this one are shedding light on the “dark matter” within microbial genomes ­­– the enormous number of genes in bacteria and in archaea whose functions are a mystery,” says Supek.The thousands of computational predictions generated will need to be validated in experiments. Once validated, they may lead to the discovery of new genes that explain how bacteria shape the ecosystems around us and indeed the ecosystem within us—the human microbiome.Source: https://www.irbbarcelona.org/en/news/the-depths-of-the-ocean-and-gut-flora-unravel-the-mystery-of-microbial-geneslast_img read more

Top Stories Plastic Rocks Cool Koalas and Burning Calories

Scientists have long believed that our moon was formed after another planet crashed into Earth, destroying itself and shooting out debris that eventually coalesced into our lone lunar satellite. There’s one problem: Studies of the chemical composition of Earth and moon rocks don’t fit this model. Now, a new analysis of moon rocks has uncovered evidence to support the theory—and to explain the mystery of the moon’s chemical makeup.Science Moneyball: The Secret to a Successful Academic CareerFor biomedical researchers who aspire to run their own labs, the secret is to publish frequently, as first author, and in top journals. That career advice may seem obvious, but this time it’s backed up by a new analysis of data scraped from PubMed, the massive public repository of biological abstracts. See what your chances are using Science’s PI Predictor graph.A New Way to Burn CaloriesWhat if you could trick your body into thinking you were racing on a treadmill—and burning off calories—while simply walking down the street? A new study in mice explores how we can activate immune cells to make this happen—and how the process can help fight obesity and diabetes.Trees Become Refrigerators for KoalasWhen they hug acacia trees, koalas aren’t just trying to keep from falling—the trees help the marsupials cool off, researchers have discovered. The cool tree trunks stop them from overheating, suggesting that koalas need more than just eucalyptus to survive.Key Researcher Agrees to Retract Both Disputed Stem Cell PapersEarlier this year, two papers reported that simply stressing adult cells could turn them into powerful stem cells called STAP (stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency) cells—and immediately drew accusations of plagiarism and image manipulation. Now, despite steadfastly defending her work, the lead author behind the papers has finally agreed to retract them both. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Rocks Made of Plastic Found on Hawaiian BeachPlastic may be with us a lot longer than we thought. A new type of rock made from plastic, volcanic rock, sand, seashells, and corals has begun forming on the shores of Hawaii. The discovery adds to the debate about whether humanity’s heavy hand in natural processes warrants the formal declaration of a new epoch of Earth history called the Anthropocene.How Did the Moon Really Form? Email read more

Relocating Australian tortoise sets controversial precedent

first_imgFor the western swamp tortoise, whose numbers in the wild are now estimated at just 50 breeding adults, declining rainfall is the primary concern. The 15-centimeter-long tortoises feed when rains fill swampy habitats in winter, and then enter a state of dormancy known as estivation when the swamps dry out to clay pans in the late spring or early summer. The less rain in winter, the more likely the hatchlings and juveniles will starve before the next winter rains arrive. Swamps that were wet for 5 to 7 months of the year in the 1960s are now often dry for most of the year, and rainfall is set to decline further in the future. Hemmed in by urban sprawl and agricultural land, the tortoises can’t up and move, either. “It’s a double whammy,” says conservation physiologist Nicola Mitchell from the University of Western Australia in Perth, who is leading the trial.Herculean conservation efforts—carving out nature reserves, establishing captive breeding programs, pumping water into swamps in dry years—have done little to shore up the tortoise’s future in the wild, which is why Mitchell and her colleagues have turned to assisted colonization. “It was time to try something a little bit out there,” she says.“It’s a bold thing to do and it’s a good thing to try,” says conservation biologist Hugh Possingham from the University of Queensland, St. Lucia, in Brisbane, Australia, who is not involved in the trial.But others worry that such introductions could disrupt existing species, and that negative impacts may not become apparent for decades. Anthony Ricciardi, an invasive species biologist at McGill University in Montreal, Canada, sees assisted colonization as “ecological gambling.” The impacts of assisted colonization—“planned invasions,” he calls them—are notoriously difficult to predict.“Any conservation action you take is in itself questionable and should be questioned,” says Gerald Kuchling from the Western Australian Department of Parks and Wildlife in Perth, who has headed the swamp tortoise recovery efforts for the past 28 years. “But at some stage, you have to do a trial to actually find out what it means to assist them in colonizing completely new areas.”Even if the tortoises prove benign, as Mitchell and Kuchling anticipate, Ricciardi fears that such trials set an alarming precedent. “Other people are going to be looking at [this trial] and they’re going to be saying, ‘OK, what about my species?’” he says. “I wouldn’t like to spin that roulette wheel very many times.”Assisted colonization has already been used for plant species, such as Torreya taxifolia, an endangered conifer native to the Florida panhandle. Conservationists in New Zealand are also weighing the strategy to save the endangered hihi, or stitchbird (Notiomystis cincta), which faces an uncertain future if not moved to cooler climates farther south.But Possingham doubts the floodgates will open any time soon. “It’s not open slather,” he says, and scientists will judge each proposed colonization on its merits. For Possingham, who thinks assisted colonization will become a “pragmatic” conservation tool to prevent extinctions, results of the trial can’t come soon enough. “Unless we try these things, we’ll never learn how to do them, so the sooner the better.” Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) As long as it has been known to science, the diminutive western swamp tortoise has been in peril. By the time it was formally named in 1901—using a decades-old museum specimen—Pseudemydura umbrina was presumed extinct. And since it was rediscovered in the 1950s, biologists have struggled to protect it from the twin threats of habitat loss and introduced predators, which drove its numbers to bottom out at just 30 individuals in the 1980s. Now that climate change poses an even more urgent threat to the endangered tortoise, biologists have a controversial plan to safeguard its future—by moving it to new sites outside of its known historical range. The translocation, which took place today, makes the tortoise the first vertebrate to be deliberately relocated because of climate change.The yearlong trial, several years in the planning, will track 12 captively bred juvenile tortoises released to each of two sites roughly 250 kilometers south of their native habitat on the outskirts of Perth, Australia. Although the sites aren’t ideal for the tortoises now, detailed modeling of rainfall, temperature, swamp hydrology, and tortoise biology predict they will be in half a century.The trial will be a contentious test case in conservation circles. Introducing nonnative species into new ecosystems has an ignominious history, not least in Australia, where the deliberately introduced European red fox and domestic cat have wreaked havoc on native wildlife. But the idea of assisted colonization has gained some favor over the past decade as conservationists grapple with the impacts of rapidly changing climate on habitat suitability for numerous flora and fauna. Emailcenter_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

Two female scientists and a militant environmentalist join Emmanuel Macrons new government

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Science will have a bigger voice in the next French government. Newly elected President Emmanuel Macron announced yesterday that a molecular geneticist–turned–university administrator will head the new ministry of higher education, research, and innovation, while a highly respected physician-scientist is France’s new health minister. Both are women—as is fully half of the new cabinet.But perhaps the biggest surprise was the appointment of the immensely popular green activist Nicolas Hulot at the new Ministry of “Ecological and Solidarity-based Transition.” Hulot—who has called Donald Trump’s retreat from the Clean Power Plan “a crime against humanity” and who wants to phase out nuclear energy—is credited with major changes in French environmental policy in the past decade—but always from outside the government.Frédérique Vidal, 53, the new research minister for science, spent most of her career at the University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, where she increasingly focused on education and climbed through the administrative ranks until becoming university president in 2012. The fact that Vidal “knows the sector … is a good thing,” says Patrick Monfort, secretary general of SNCS-FSU, a trade union for researchers based near Paris. Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country By Elisabeth PainMay. 18, 2017 , 5:30 PM Two female scientists and a militant environmentalist join Emmanuel Macron’s new governmentcenter_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Christophe Ena/ASSOCIATED PRESS Molecular geneticist and university administrator Frédérique Vidal is France’s new minister for higher education, research, and innovation. The French Conference of University Presidents (CPU) welcomed Vidal’s appointment in a public statement yesterday. CPU says it’s also an “excellent signal to the university community” that research and higher education once again have a full-fledged ministry, after being relegated to the level of secretary of state by former President François Hollande in 2014. Macron, who has promised to kick-start the economy through science, also added the word “innovation” to the ministry’s title.The other researcher in the new administration is Agnès Buzyn, who will head the health ministry—a post Macron had promised to give to a physician. Aged 54, Buzyn spent most of her career as a clinical hematologist studying leukemia and bone marrow transplantation at Paris Descartes University and the Necker Hospital. A former president of the French National Cancer Institute, Buzyn has played many high-level science policy roles and is highly respected among her peers. But as French newspaper L’Express reported yesterday, some have criticized her for questioning the need for scientists working with the pharmaceutical industry to declare their conflicts of interest.And as it happens, she has a bit of a conflict herself: Buzyn is married to Yves Lévy, who leads the €1 billion French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (INSERM), which is jointly overseen by the research and health ministries. Le Monde reports that Buzyn will not handle any issues related to INSERM, but details of the arrangement are unclear. As the paper points out, the ministry interacts with the institute on an almost daily basis.Meanwhile, the appointment of Hulot, 62, has excited French friends of the environment. A former nature documentary maker, Hulot arrived at the first cabinet meeting today in an electric car and without a tie. He instigated the inclusion of an environmental charter in the French constitution in 2005 and triggered a national policy debate that led to two new environmental laws in 2008 and 2010 that seek to drastically reduce greenhouse gas emissions, promote renewable energy, and better regulate pesticides. As a special envoy of the French president for the protection of the planet, he helped prepare the 2015 Paris climate conference.According to French newspaper Le Monde yesterday, Hulot hopes to reform the tax system to make production and consumption more sustainable, and to set in motion a transition toward sustainable energy. He also wants to start a national debate on sustainable food production.Hulot toyed with the idea of running for president himself in the last three presidential elections, but has repeatedly declined positions in previous governments. The big question is how much of his agenda he can deliver in Macron’s centrist administration, however. Monfort—who studies the impact of climate change on pathogenic water bacteria at the University of Montpellier—hopes Hulot’s nomination means that he “has secured some guarantees” about what he will be able to do.Update, 19 May, 6.30 a.m.:  The paragraph about Buzyn’s conflict of interest has been updated.last_img read more

Volcanic lightning may be partially fed by Earths natural radioactivity

first_img By Sid PerkinsMar. 26, 2019 , 10:55 AM Volcanic lightning may be partially fed by Earth’s natural radioactivity Corrado Cimarelli center_img Much of the lightning that flickers around and within the ash plumes of erupting volcanoes is triggered by static electricity, which builds up when ash particles scrape against each other in flight. Now, a field study suggests Earth’s natural radioactivity may also help volcanic plumes get electrically charged—even when those clouds contain little or no ash.Scientists have long known that radon, a radioactive gas, is a part of the plumes that spew from active volcanoes. When those radioactive atoms decay, they emit charged particles and create “daughter” elements that also decay and emit charged particles of their own. In the fall of 2017, using balloon-borne instruments (pictured above) lofted from the peak of Stromboli—an active volcano on an island near the toe of Italy’s “boot”—researchers measured how much electrical charge builds up in an eruption plume for the first time.In some parts of the eruption cloud, the numbers of charged particles per cubic meter were at least 80 times the numbers found in a typical cloud on an overcast day, the team reports this month in Geophysical Research Letters. Data also reveal that positive and negative charges migrate to different parts of the eruption plume, setting up voltage differences. Those differences aren’t strong enough to trigger lightning by themselves, but in ash-filled plumes they may either slightly add to or diminish the charge differences generated by static electricity, the researchers note. It’s not yet clear, they add, how such changes would influence the strength, frequency, or brightness of volcanic lightning.last_img read more

Watch an ant rip apart a spiderweb to rescue a sibling

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Watch an ant rip apart a spiderweb to rescue a sibling Emailcenter_img Ants are famous for putting themselves at risk for the wellbeing of their colony, but desert harvester ants (Veromessor pergandei) are especially heroic. New research suggests the insects charge into spiderwebs to rescue their ensnared nestmates, sometimes ripping the silk apart to free them.Researchers first observed the fearless ants in 2015 in the Mojave and Sonoran deserts. Not only did the insects free their comrades from the sticky silk, they dismantled the entire web afterward, ripping it apart with their jaws for up to 2 hours, the team reports in The American Naturalist. The rescues weren’t without personal risk; about 6% of rescuers got stuck in the silk themselves or were captured by the spider lurking nearby.When the scientists brought the ants back to their lab, they discovered that the insects ignored empty webs. Their valor is likely spurred by chemical distress signals put out by their web-bound siblings, the team suspects. By Jake BuehlerJun. 7, 2019 , 12:25 PM The findings put desert harvester ants in an exclusive club of animals that engage in “rescue behavior,” which is typically reserved for mammals like primates and dolphins. Even rarer are those that destroy traps, limited among vertebrates to two groups of chimpanzees and mountain gorillas that disassemble poachers’ snares.The researchers think the ants’ heroic streak may have evolved because V. pergandei has to collect enough seeds for the colony to produce hundreds of new ants daily. This makes every forager’s life—and their labor—indispensable.last_img read more

First Ebola case in African border metropolis could be a gamechanger WHO

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) The first case of Ebola was diagnosed yesterday in Goma, a city in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) that’s home to some 1 million people. Goma is a hub of transborder traffic between the DRC and Rwanda and hosts an international airport; the discovery heightened fears that the epidemic, now in its 10th month, may become even harder to squelch.At a 3-hour high-level meeting in Geneva, Switzerland, today, World Health Organization (WHO) Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said he is reconvening a special committee “as soon as possible” to consider whether the epidemic, which has killed 1665 people in the DRC, now needs to be declared a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC), a designation that can rally international support but can also isolate a country when other states impose travel bans, as occurred in the West African Ebola epidemic in 2014. Noting that Goma “is a gateway to the region and the world,” Tedros said the case there “could potentially be a game-changer.” Although the epidemic is still confined to the provinces of North Kivu and Ituri, in the northeast of the country, “the response is at a critical juncture,” WHO added in a statement released after the meeting. “WHO assesses the risk of spread to neighboring provinces and countries as very high.”The Emergency Committee is a group of external experts convened by WHO to assess whether a public health crisis potentially has global reach and requires a global response. Since the outbreak began in August 2018, the committee has convened three times, most recently in June. Every time, it declined to elevate the epidemic to PHEIC status. A WHO spokesperson says the group could reconvene as early as this week. FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images By Meredith WadmanJul. 15, 2019 , 5:35 PM World Health Organization Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus (right) at a high-level meeting today where he called the first Ebola case in the crossroads city of Goma “potentially a game-changer.” Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe First Ebola case in African border metropolis could be a ‘game-changer,’ WHO leader warns The call for a new assessment comes days after the DRC rejected the use of any additional Ebola vaccines—in addition to the Merck vaccine that’s being deployed widely—during this epidemic.Many public health experts had argued for the introduction of a second, still-experimental Ebola vaccine, made by Johnson & Johnson (J&J) of New Brunswick, New Jersey; its use was discussed during an international meeting in Kinshasa on 28 and 29 June. But on 12 July, DRC health minister Oly Ilunga Kalenga announced the government would not allow the use of the J&J vaccine or any others. He cited “a lack of sufficient scientific evidence on the efficacy and safety of other vaccines, and the risk of confusing the population,” which is already very distrustful of the health workers fighting Ebola and is inundated by false rumors about the epidemic.Unlike the Merck vaccine, which was shown to work well during the West African epidemic, the J&J vaccine has not been tested for efficacy in people potentially exposed to Ebola. But the vaccine, which consists of two different shots given 56 days apart, has been found safe in phase I and II studies involving more than 6000 healthy volunteers, generates robust antibody responses, and has protected nonhuman primates exposed to Ebola, Peter Piot, director of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) said in a statement today. (LSHTM is participating in a study of the vaccine in multiple African countries.)The Merck vaccine has been administered to some 161,000 people in the DRC, including 3000 health workers in Goma. Merck says it has an additional 245,000 vaccine doses ready to ship, and capacity to produce another 900,000 over the coming 6 months to 18 months. But experts worry that’s not enough. “We are very concerned that supplies of the Merck vaccine currently being used will run out before this epidemic ends, which would have devastating consequences,” Josie Golding, epidemics lead at the Wellcome Trust in London, said in a statement delivered at today’s high-level meeting. “There is an urgent need to deploy a second vaccine,” she said. “We regret the recent announcement against the use of the J&J vaccine and ask for this to be reconsidered. Lives … depend on it.”Piot agrees. “It is hard to understand why such a decision was taken, going so far as to ban any research on investigational Ebola vaccines in the country during this outbreak,” he said in his statement. “The DRC has been a leader in innovation during Ebola outbreaks, and should remain at the forefront of research and innovation in this area.”“We respect the decision of the DRC minister of health regarding Ebola vaccine studies in the country,” Paul Stoffels, J&J’s chief scientific officer, said in a statement today. “We remain ready to mobilize our resources if we are called on to help with outbreak response efforts.” The company says it has enough vaccine stockpiled to vaccinate some 1.5 million people.Distrust of the government and Ebola response teams runs deep in the poor, conflict-ridden region of the DRC where the epidemic occurs. On Saturday, two community health workers were murdered there, Tedros told the meeting today, bringing to seven the number killed since January. There have been an additional 198 nonfatal attacks on health facilities and health workers in the past 6 months.The newly diagnosed Ebola patient was a preacher who traveled from Butembo, DRC, at the heart of the current epidemic, to Goma by bus and was admitted yesterday to a Doctors Without Borders–supported treatment facility, where a blood test confirmed he had Ebola. The patient was quickly isolated, and the bus driver and 18 passengers are being vaccinated beginning today, according to a statement from local government authorities in North Kivu province, of which Goma is the capital. Today, the Ministry of Health transferred the patient back to Butembo for care, the statement said.“The case was not only detected [very rapidly] but isolated immediately, avoiding all additional contamination,” said the official communiqué signed by Nzanzu Kasivita Carly, a health official with the provincial government of North Kivu.*Update, 17 July, 10:50 a.m.: The DRC health ministry confirmed that the Goma patient died while in transit to Butembo.last_img read more

Trump White House shelves adversarial review of climate science

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe “It’s been totally stymied by the forces of darkness within the administration, but also by the looming election campaign,” said Myron Ebell, a senior fellow at the conservative Competitive Enterprise Institute in Washington, D.C., who led the Environmental Protection Agency transition team under Trump.Happer has consulted conservative groups that attack climate science in an attempt to recruit members for the proposed panel. He’s spoken with policy analysts at the Competitive Enterprise Institute, the Heartland Institute in Arlington Heights, Illinois, and the CO2 Coalition, a group Happer founded and that claims that the world would be better off with higher levels of carbon dioxide emissions. The theories promoted by those groups are rejected by NASA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the world’s top science academies.Happer initially wanted Trump to issue an executive order to create the “Presidential Committee on Climate Security.” He wanted the panel to review assertions within the National Climate Assessment related to risks from climate change on national security. Happer briefed Trump on climate science at least twice (Climatewire, June 24).The idea to create the panel has caused strife within the White House. Among its critics are deputy chief of staff Chris Liddell; Kevin Hassett, the outgoing chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers; Larry Kudlow, director of the National Economic Council; and Kelvin Droegemeier, the president’s science adviser. Those supporting the plan include Trump’s son-in-law and senior adviser Jared Kushner and Brooke Rollins, assistant to Trump in the Office of American Innovation.An official at NSC disputed the characterization that the panel was dead, even while confirming that it had been indefinitely delayed. The plan has suffered several downgrades over the months. It was initially proposed as a rapid response team of climate science critics who would challenge government publications on human-caused warming. Recent discussions have centered on the idea of forcing government climate scientists to participate in a debate with critics of their work who deny that humans are causing widespread changes on Earth (Climatewire, June 6). Most recently, the plan was diminished to creating dueling white papers that would elevate climate denialism to the level of consensus science.Those in talks to participate as critics of mainstream science include John Christy of the University of Alabama, Huntsville, and Judith Curry, former head of the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at Georgia Tech in Atlanta, Georgia. A potential leader of the exercise was Paul Robinson, a former Department of Energy official who oversaw talks about nuclear weapons tests with the Soviet Union, but who is not trained in climate science.Trump supporters who want the administration to be more aggressive in its rejection of climate science were frustrated that the climate review panel had been sidelined. Ebell of the Competitive Enterprise Institute sees it as a sign that the Trump campaign is sensitive to Democratic attacks on climate change.“The reelect campaign has been completely taken over by the usual cast of Republican establishment consultants who are primarily concerned with making very large amounts of money on the campaign,” Ebell said.Reprinted from Climatewire with permission from E&E News. Copyright 2019. E&E provides essential news for energy and environment professionals at www.eenews.net iStock.com/bboserup Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Trump White House shelves ‘adversarial’ review of climate science Emailcenter_img By Scott Waldman, E&E NewsJul. 9, 2019 , 12:00 PM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Read more… Originally published by E&E NewsThe proposed White House panel that would conduct an “adversarial” review of climate science is dead for now, as President Donald Trump grapples with negative perceptions of his environmental record at the outset of his reelection campaign.The months-long push from within the National Security Council to review established science on climate change divided White House advisers and generated sharp opposition from researchers across the country. The effort, led by a physicist overseeing technology issues at the NSC, William Happer, stalled indefinitely amid internal disagreements within the White House, according to two sources.last_img read more

Researchers redesign a cancerbusting protein—without the side effects

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Ian Haydon/Institute for Protein Design For patients with aggressive kidney and skin cancers, an immune-boosting protein called interleukin-2 (IL-2) can be a lifesaver. But the dose at which it fights cancer can also produce life-threatening side effects. Now, scientists have used computer modeling to design a new protein from scratch that mimics IL-2’s immune-enhancing abilities, while avoiding its dangerous side effects. The protein has so far been tested only in animals, but it may soon enter human trials.IL-2 plays a key role in directing the body’s immune response to outside invaders. The protein, a signaling molecule called a cytokine, ramps up the activity of white blood cells known as T lymphocytes by binding simultaneously to their IL-2β and IL-2γ receptors. In cells where a third type of receptor, IL-2α, is present, IL-2 binds collectively to all three. In other white blood cells, this dampens the body’s immune response. But it can also occur in cells in blood vessels, causing those vessels to leak, a potentially deadly condition.“People have tried for 30 years to alter IL-2 to make it safer and more effective,” says Daniel Adriano Silva Manzano, a biochemist at the University of Washington (UW) in Seattle and first author of the new study. But IL-2 is unstable and stops working when it loses its normal 3D shape, and many mutations destabilize the structure further, Silva Manzano says. To do better, Silva Manzano teamed up with lab director David Baker, a protein designer at UW, and colleagues in the United States, Portugal, Spain, and the United Kingdom, to remake IL-2 from scratch. They started by studying atomic maps of IL-2 interacting with the desirable β and γ receptors, as well as the undesirable α receptor. IL-2 is a single long chain of amino acids. When it folds up into its active 3D shape, it forms four segments that twist into spirals called alpha helixes that are held together by a series of loops that tie them together in a bundle. At the bottom of this bundle of helixes are two sites that bind to the β and γ receptors. Meanwhile, portions of one of the helixes and two loops at the top of the protein bind to α receptors.Baker, Silva, and their colleagues programmed protein-design software Baker had developed, called Rosetta, to maintain the needed interactions with the β and γ receptors but eliminate the portion that binds to α receptors. Rosetta produced 40 options. After analyzing them, the team synthesized and tested 22, tweaking the best to improve the designer protein’s stability and its effectiveness at binding the desired receptors.Finally, the researchers settled on a version they dubbed Neo-2/15, which shares only 14% of its amino acid sequence with IL-2. Lab studies revealed it bound tightly to β and γ receptors, but not to α receptors. In mouse models of colon cancer and melanoma, the compound reduced side effects associated with α receptors, strongly inhibited tumor growth, and even eliminated tumors in a handful of animals. Regular IL-2 given to other mice didn’t do the latter, they report today in Nature.“The approach they took was brilliant,” says James Olson, a clinical oncologist at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle who was not affiliated with the work. If it reduces dangerous side effects in people, Neo-2/15 could let doctors give patients more treatment, and for longer periods, to help the immune system wipe out cancer, Olson says. It may also prove valuable in combination with approved immunotherapy drugs called checkpoint inhibitors, which block tumors from hiding from immune sentries, he says.UW has licensed Neo-2/15 to a Seattle startup called Neoleukin Therapeutics that is working to bring it to clinical trials. Researchers at the company are exploring how antibodies might target the protein at tumors rather than normal cells, so as not to spark an autoimmune response, says Silva Manzano, who plans to join the company as head of research. Baker adds that a similar approach of selectively seeking out certain receptors could prove useful in ramping up immune responses against other types of cancers, as well as in dampening immune responses to autoimmune diseases. Olson agrees. “This is just the first shot across the bow,” he says. By Robert F. ServiceJan. 9, 2019 , 1:00 PM When a designer protein (red) binds to immune cell receptors (gray and purple), it ramps up immune activity that kills cancer cells.center_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email Researchers redesign a cancer-busting protein—without the side effects Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! 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Called for probe JDU man found hanging in police station

first_img Nitish Kumar to remain CM as long as people of Bihar want him to: JD(U) Student death, Class 9 student death,Class 9 student death West Bengal, West Bengal news, India news, The Indian Express news On Thursday night, Ganesh, who was the Mahadalit cell president of the Nagarnausa block, was detained in connection with the alleged kidnapping of a girl from his village. (Representational Image)A Local leader of the ruling JD(U), who was detained by the Nalanda police in connection with a kidnapping case, allegedly hanged himself inside the station late on Thursday night. Advertising By Express News Service |Patna | Published: July 13, 2019 3:29:58 am Post Comment(s) Related News In the FIR, Balram alleged that his father was “killed by police station in-charge Balindra Rai and Chowkidar Jitendra Kumar. There are cut-marks on several places, suggesting it is a case of torture.”DIG, Central Range, Rajesh Kumar, said: “The police station in-charge and two others have been arrested. We will investigate the case”. JD(U) to contest 3 seats in UP besides Manipur, Lakshadweep Sharad Yadav faction has formed new party: JDU to Delhi High Court Three policemen were arrested in connection with the case, added the officer. The family of the leader, identified as Ganesh Ravidas, claim that the police tortured him in custody.On Thursday night, Ganesh, who was the Mahadalit cell president of the Nagarnausa block, was detained in connection with the alleged kidnapping of a girl from his village. He was suspected to have helped the girl elope. During the course of the interrogation, Ganesh reportedly went to use the washroom outside the lock-up. He then allegedly hanged himself from the window in the washroom. As news of his death spread, villagers staged a protest.Following the incident, the district police suspended Nagarnausa police station’s in-charge, an assistant sub inspector and chowkidar. The three were later arrested based on a case filed against them by Ganesh’s son Balram at the SC/ST police station in Biharsharif. Advertisinglast_img read more

Podcast Do scientists make great contributions after 30 We chat with experts

first_img Do scientists make great contributions after age 30? How important is it to stand on the shoulders of giants? Does the truth win, or do its opponents just eventually die out? Meta-analyses—structured analyses of many studies on the same topic—were once seen as objective and definitive projects that helped sort out conflicts amongst smaller studies. These days, thousands of meta-analyses are published every year—many either redundant or contrary to earlier metaworks. Host Sarah Crespi talks to freelance science journalist Jop de Vrieze about ongoing meta-analysis wars in which opposing research teams churn out conflicting metastudies around important public health questions such as links between violent video games and school shootings and the effects of antidepressants. They also talk about what clues to look for when trying to evaluate the quality of a meta-analysis.Sarah also talked with three other contributors to our “Research on Research” special issue. Pierre Azoulay of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, Ben Jones of Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, and MIT’s Heidi Williams discuss the evidence for some hoary old scientific home truths. See whether you can guess who originally made these claims and how right or wrong they were: Davide Bonazzi/@SalzmanArt center_img Read the rest of the package on science under scrutiny here.This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.Download a transcript of this episode (PDF)Listen to previous podcasts.About the Science Podcast[Image: Davide Bonazzi/@SalzmanArt; Show music: Jeffrey Cook; additional music: Nguyen Khoi Nguyen]last_img read more

EU slaps sanctions on Turkey over gas drilling off Cyprus

first_imgBy AP |Brussels | Published: July 16, 2019 7:31:13 am Related News Former UK PM Major vows legal action to block suspension of parliament Europe should brace for US tariffs on several fronts, says German official EU probes Amazon over use of retailer info to gain edge ‘Truth, justice have prevailed’: PM Modi on Kulbhushan Jadhav verdict Jharkhand court drops ‘donate Quran’ condition for bail to Ranchi woman over offensive post The ministers said in a statement that in light of Turkey’s “continued and new illegal drilling activities,” they were suspending talks on an air transport agreement and would call on the European Investment Bank to “review” it’s lending to the country.They also backed a proposal by the EU’s executive branch to reduce financial assistance to Turkey for next year. The ministers warned that additional “targeted measures” were being worked on to penalize Turkey, which started negotiations to join the EU in 2005.Turkey’s Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu issued his own warning last week that his country would step up drilling activities off Cyprus if the EU moved ahead with sanctions. Salve hails verdict, says ICJ protected Jadhav from being executed Explained: Kulbhushan Jadhav case file Advertising More Explained Advertising Cyprus was split along ethnic lines in 1974 when Turkey invaded in the wake of a coup by supporters of union with Greece. A Turkish Cypriot declaration of independence is recognized only by Turkey, which keeps more than 35,000 troops in the breakaway north. Cyprus joined the EU in 2004, but only the internationally recognized south enjoys full membership benefits.Turkey contends that it’s protecting its rights and those of Turkish Cypriots to the area’s hydrocarbon deposits. Cypriot officials, however, accuse Turkey of using the minority Turkish Cypriots in order to pursue its goal of exerting control over the eastern Mediterranean region.The Cypriot government says it will take legal action against any oil and gas companies supporting Turkish vessels in any repeat attempt to drill for gas. Cyprus has already issued around 20 international arrest warrants against three international companies assisting one of the two Turkish vessels now drilling 42 miles (68 kilometers) off the island’s west coast.The Cyprus government has licensed energy companies including ExxonMobil, France’s Total and Italy’s Eni to carry out gas drilling in blocks, or areas, off the island’s southern coastline. At least three significant gas deposits have so far been discovered there. The Cypriot government says energy discussions with Turkish Cypriots should be part of overarching reunification talks, adding that Turkish Cypriot rights to the island’s energy reserves are assured. The government says future gas proceeds that will flow into an established hydrocarbons fund will be shared equitably after a peace deal is signed. Best Of Express Asylum applications in EU rise as more Venezuelans seek refuge The EU ministers repeated the “serious immediate negative impact” that Turkey’s illegal actions are having on EU-Turkey relations and called on Ankara to respect Cyprus’ sovereign rights in line with international law. (REUTERS)European Union foreign ministers on Monday turned up the pressure on Turkey after approving an initial batch of sanctions against the country over its drilling for gas in waters where EU member Cyprus has exclusive economic rights. Post Comment(s) Advertising Meanwhile, Cyprus’ Greek Cypriot President Nicos Anastasiades will chair a meeting of political leaders Tuesday to discuss a renewed proposal by Turkish Cypriot leader Mustafa AKinci to establish a joint committee with Greek Cypriots on managing offshore gas drilling activities.Akinci has repeatedly called for the creation of such a committee that he says would give his community a say in how newly found gas deposits off Cyprus’ southern coast are managed and future proceeds are divvied up. A similar proposal was made by Akinci’s predecessor Dervis Eroglu in 2011. Two Turkish vessels escorted by warships are drilling for gas on either end of ethnically divided Cyprus.The EU ministers repeated the “serious immediate negative impact” that Turkey’s illegal actions are having on EU-Turkey relations and called on Ankara to respect Cyprus’ sovereign rights in line with international law.They also welcomed the Cypriot government’s invitation to Turkey to negotiate the borders of their respective exclusive economic zones and continental shelf.Turkey doesn’t recognize Cyprus as a state and claims 44% of Cyprus’ exclusive economic zone as its own, according to Cyprus government officials. Turkish Cypriots in the east Mediterranean island nation’s breakaway north claim another 25%.last_img read more