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ND switches to recycled paper

first_imgIn the next year, Notre Dame will have the power to save the equivalent of 18 trees, water from 130 showers and 453 gallons of gasoline ⎯ all by switching to recycled paper. Office of Sustainability Programs Manager Erin Hafner said the change, which will begin Nov. 1 and take full effect Jan. 1, 2012, is part of an initiative several years in the making. “We asked about this change a couple of years ago, but it wasn’t feasible,” she said. “When the Office of Public Affairs and Communications changed the Notre Dame brand standards, we saw this as an opportunity to update the paper.” The change will affect University letterheads, business cards, envelopes and other paper items printed from Express Press, a South Bend printer. As a result of an agreement between the University, the printer and the paper supplier, the change will come with zero cost increase, Hafner said. “We pick and choose our initiatives based on the greatest impact,” she said. “This is a centralized change.” Javier Hernandez, a procurement specialist who worked on the project, said Express Press was an excellent partner to work with on the change. “Express Press made this transition easy,” Hernandez said. “We’re trying to be a leader with this initiative,” he said. Hernandez said the stationary will look slightly different. Although the paper will still come from the current stationary provider, Neenah Paper, the new stock will be a brighter white than the current stock. In an announcement through Procurement Services, Hafner said Neenah Paper advocates the green sentiments of its paper products through its company practices. “Neenah Paper is truly dedicated to reducing its carbon footprint,” she said in the announcement. “They generate their own hydroelectric power at their mills in Wisconsin and Germany, they are one of the largest purchasers of [independently certified] renewable energy in Wisconsin and they are putting major efforts into energy conservation. As a result, their North American mills have cut their [carbon dioxide] emissions almost in half over the last decade.” According to the announcement, six out of seven Neenah Paper company mills have achieved a company-wide goal of zero landfill waste.last_img read more

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Panel affirms immorality of capital punishment

first_imgTwo Notre Dame professors and a retired local priest asserted capital punishment is immoral at a Wednesday panel discussion. Adjunct Instructor of Writing and Rhetoric Ed Kelly said he opposes the death penalty for three reasons. “First of all, there are systems of privilege and oppression in place in this country that I think make it virtually impossible for the death penalty to be applied fairly and justly,” he said. “Consequently, we have many people of color and many, many poor people who find themselves on death row, and that’s unfair.” Kelly said he believes it is impossible to combat violence with violence, and that state-sanctioned violence is nonsensical. He said he also opposes the death penalty because people who are not imprisoned often have much more in common with prisoners than they expect. “I have four children,” Kelly said. “None of my daughters has been raped. Our only son has not been killed … Still, I would argue that all people are redeemable, that redemption is possible for everyone. Thus, I’m opposed to the death penalty.” Fr. Tom McNally, a retired priest who volunteers as a chaplain at the Indiana State Prison, shared his experience speaking with prisoners on death row shortly before their executions. He said tensions run high in the small rooms where executions occur near midnight. “The men come in [and] they’re on a gurney,” McNally said. “I always wave and bless them, a last blessing, and they wave back … They close the blinds, and then a poison is injected … All the time that this is going on, there’s just this heaviness in my heart.” McNally said his experiences witnessing prisoners’ executions have caused him to consider capital punishment “terribly unfair.” Jay Tidmarsh, a professor of law, said capital punishment is unjust because some prosecutors will ask a court to put a prisoner to death while others will not. “Different prosecutors in the state have different attitudes,” Tidmarsh said. “The arbitrariness in that sense of the death penalty is, to me, stunning. It’s not the quality of the act [that determines whether someone is put to death] … In many circumstances, it is the quality of the person who decides whether or not to seek the death penalty.” The judicial system deludes all involved to believe they are not responsible for putting someone to death, Tidmarsh said. “We’re supposed to have systems of rules that are relatively fair and neutral,” he said. “The reality is in our system no one actually is responsible for putting someone to death. We have divided up the system of responsibility in such a way where it’s always somebody else, or we believe, at least, that it’s always somebody else.” Tidmarsh said the Supreme Court has made clear that automatic death sentences for certain crimes are unconstitutional. Instead, whether someone is put to death must be decided on a case-by-case basis. “You have to allow individuals to mitigate, to explain,” Tidmarsh said. “It can’t be automatic.” Kelly said he does not believe capital punishment does not deter crime. “In fact … the surest way to make a person violent is to punish him, and of course, capital punishment is the worst form of punishment,” he said. It is difficult, however, to argue capital punishment is “cruel and unusual,” as described by the United States Constitution, Tidmarsh said. “If you believe that the Constitution ought to be interpreted faithfully to the meaning of the people who originally adopted it, they executed people back then for lots of crimes that today we would never execute someone for,” he said “[But] what wasn’t cruel 200 years ago might be cruel today.” If most states abolish the death penalty, the Supreme Court might rule capital punishment cruel and unusual under evolving notions of decency, Tidmarsh said. Kelly said although he is generally in favor of sentencing prisoners of capital crimes to life imprisonment, parole should be possible for prisoners who prove they have changed for the better. “What you really need to do is take prisoners who have been put in prison and have them work on transforming,” he said. “It’s quite possible for the lives of people who have done terrible things to be halfway decent, even the imprisoned.” Tidmarsh said he thinks many prisoners are sentenced to death because victims’ families demonstrate an unwillingness to forgive the perpetrators. Kelly said executing criminals rarely helps family members heal. “People talk about closure,” he said. “But there’s really no closure for many families.” It is important for Catholics to oppose the death penalty, Kelly said. “I think Sr. [Helen] Prejean [an advocate for the abolition of capital punishment] would argue that all life is sacred, not just innocent life,” he said. “And if you believe all life is sacred, how can you believe capital punishment is okay?”,Two Notre Dame professors and a retired local priest asserted capital punishment is immoral at a Wednesday panel discussion. Adjunct Instructor of Writing and Rhetoric Ed Kelly said he opposes the death penalty for three reasons. “First of all, there are systems of privilege and oppression in place in this country that I think make it virtually impossible for the death penalty to be applied fairly and justly,” he said. “Consequently, we have many people of color and many, many poor people who find themselves on death row, and that’s unfair.” Kelly said he believes it is impossible to combat violence with violence, and that state-sanctioned violence is nonsensical. He said he also opposes the death penalty because people who are not imprisoned often have much more in common with prisoners than they expect. “I have four children,” Kelly said. “None of my daughters has been raped. Our only son has not been killed … Still, I would argue that all people are redeemable, that redemption is possible for everyone. Thus, I’m opposed to the death penalty.” Fr. Tom McNally, a retired priest who volunteers as a chaplain at the Indiana State Prison, shared his experience speaking with prisoners on death row shortly before their executions. He said tensions run high in the small rooms where executions occur near midnight. “The men come in [and] they’re on a gurney,” McNally said. “I always wave and bless them, a last blessing, and they wave back … They close the blinds, and then a poison is injected … All the time that this is going on, there’s just this heaviness in my heart.” McNally said his experiences witnessing prisoners’ executions have caused him to consider capital punishment “terribly unfair.” Jay Tidmarsh, a professor of law, said capital punishment is unjust because some prosecutors will ask a court to put a prisoner to death while others will not. “Different prosecutors in the state have different attitudes,” Tidmarsh said. “The arbitrariness in that sense of the death penalty is, to me, stunning. It’s not the quality of the act [that determines whether someone is put to death] … In many circumstances, it is the quality of the person who decides whether or not to seek the death penalty.” The judicial system deludes all involved to believe they are not responsible for putting someone to death, Tidmarsh said. “We’re supposed to have systems of rules that are relatively fair and neutral,” he said. “The reality is in our system no one actually is responsible for putting someone to death. We have divided up the system of responsibility in such a way where it’s always somebody else, or we believe, at least, that it’s always somebody else.” Tidmarsh said the Supreme Court has made clear that automatic death sentences for certain crimes are unconstitutional. Instead, whether someone is put to death must be decided on a case-by-case basis. “You have to allow individuals to mitigate, to explain,” Tidmarsh said. “It can’t be automatic.” Kelly said he does not believe capital punishment does not deter crime. “In fact … the surest way to make a person violent is to punish him, and of course, capital punishment is the worst form of punishment,” he said. It is difficult, however, to argue capital punishment is “cruel and unusual,” as described by the United States Constitution, Tidmarsh said. “If you believe that the Constitution ought to be interpreted faithfully to the meaning of the people who originally adopted it, they executed people back then for lots of crimes that today we would never execute someone for,” he said “[But] what wasn’t cruel 200 years ago might be cruel today.” If most states abolish the death penalty, the Supreme Court might rule capital punishment cruel and unusual under evolving notions of decency, Tidmarsh said. Kelly said although he is generally in favor of sentencing prisoners of capital crimes to life imprisonment, parole should be possible for prisoners who prove they have changed for the better. “What you really need to do is take prisoners who have been put in prison and have them work on transforming,” he said. “It’s quite possible for the lives of people who have done terrible things to be halfway decent, even the imprisoned.” Tidmarsh said he thinks many prisoners are sentenced to death because victims’ families demonstrate an unwillingness to forgive the perpetrators. Kelly said executing criminals rarely helps family members heal. “People talk about closure,” he said. “But there’s really no closure for many families.” It is important for Catholics to oppose the death penalty, Kelly said. “I think Sr. [Helen] Prejean [an advocate for the abolition of capital punishment] would argue that all life is sacred, not just innocent life,” he said. “And if you believe all life is sacred, how can you believe capital punishment is okay?”last_img read more

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Saint Mary’s first- year class expands diversity

first_imgWhen first-year orientation began Thursday, the Saint Mary’s Class of 2017 officially became the most diverse class in Belles history. Director of Admission Kristin McAndrew said 23 percent of the 441 first-year students come from historically underrepresented groups within the United States. “We have been very thoughtful about what high schools we chose to visit and where we led our recruiting efforts to make sure we reached as diverse of a population as we could,” McAndrew said. “We also had a lot of help from our current multicultural students and encouraged them to reach out to students in their hometowns and states.” The class represents 29 states and four countries outside the United States, including China, Nigeria, Turkmenistan and Vietnam, McAndrew said. “This international community fits well with the College’s commitment to global education,” McAndrew said.   The Class of 2017’s average GPA ranges from 3.51 to 4.05, while its average SAT ranges from 1550 to 1890, McAndrew said. While she was pleased with the first-year students’ scores, McAndrew said the admissions office looks at more than academics during the recruiting process. “There is no one definition of a Saint Mary’s woman,” McAndrew said. “Some of these students who moved in on Thursday are athletes and some are musicians. Some are here to become teachers and others hope to start their own businesses. But having read their applications, I can tell you that they share a common passion for community service and a love of learning.” McAndrew said 17 students from this class had a leading role in a production in high school and 101 students completed over 100 hours of community service. She said one student founded “The Birthday Project,” a program that provides underprivileged children with birthday presents, while another organized her high school’s Dance Marathon to benefit the Riley Hospital for Children in Indianapolis. “Community service is big for this class,” McAndrew said. “This is a class that I think will fit well with Saint Mary’s core value of social justice because they are a group where we saw an enormous commitment to service.” Several members of the Class of 2017 stood out as athletes on the national and international level. “Twenty-seven students in this class were captains of a varsity sport,” McAndrew said. “This class has World Champion Irish Dancers, softball state champions, state-ranked tennis players and even a girl who played on the boy’s varsity soccer team and was the first girl to score a goal on the team.” McAndrew said the College also attracted some proficient writers this year. “At Saint Mary’s we have done a lot of talking this year about the senior composition projects and our writing proficiency classes,” McAndrew said. “Just from reading their essays during the application process, I could tell we have some very strong writers in this class that will be able to take advantage of our writing opportunities here on campus.” Saint Mary’s first-year class this year is the first to be offered the “Four Year Graduation Promise.” The promise guarantees students who follow the program’s guidelines will graduate in four years or the College will pay for any additional courses a student needs to finish her degree, McAndrew said. “Our students have always worked closely with their advisors and professors to stay on track and achieve their goals,” Saint Mary’s College President Carol Ann Mooney said. “We offer the courses they need, when they need them, led by exceptional faculty who are dedicated to teaching.” She said about one quarter of this class is a legacy or has a family tradition at Saint Mary’s and has the most students out of all the classes on campus. “It is actually the largest class we have had in the past five years,” McAndrew said. McAndrew said she was happy to welcome this class to the campus Thursday and looks forward to seeing their accomplishments throughout their four years at Saint Mary’s. “This is an exciting time,” McAndrew said. “We finally get to see the young women we have come to know over the year by visiting their high schools, answering their questions and reading their essays, join the Saint Mary’s community as Belles.” Contact Kaitlyn Rabach at krabac01@saintmarys.edulast_img read more

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Speaker emphasizes developing ‘personal brand’

first_imgCompanies devote great efforts to developing their brand, and Stephanie Hightower feels that a person should heed the same efforts with their personal identity. Hightower, president of USA Track and Field and member of the 1980 Olympic track and field team discussed developing and protecting one’s personal identity in a lecture titled “Developing your Lifelong Brand” on Friday in the Vander Vennet Theatre. Cross Currents Program Collegiate Speakers Series, Women’s Entrepreneurship Initiative at Saint Mary’s College and Key4Women cosponsored the event. Hightower said the idea of brand in business is just as valuable when developing one’s own personal image and individuality. “Meaningful brands go far beyond any product,” she said. “They express what a company is, what they stand for and how they want to be perceived. Most of all, a brand is based on the experience they have with it. Apple would not be seen as cutting edge if buyers could not see, touch, hear, and know that were true and I am here to tell you that this idea of brand is just as valuable when it comes to your own self image and identity.” Hightower said there are four questions that one must ask when creating their personal brand. “What and who you are, what you stand for, how you want to be perceived, and what kind of experience people have when they work or interact with you these are all parts of defining your own personal brand,” she said. She said creating an authentic and reliable personal brand requires sticking to the truth and starting from the ground up. “You want to define your authentic self, your brand should be built on the truth of who you are, not someone else,” she said. “Next you have to build your brand from ground up. If you say you are a champion, you got to work to be a champion. If you say you are committed to excellence, then everything you do should be aimed at that goal. Hightower said building a personal brand requires a person to act in accordance with their words, because authenticity is key. “Building your personal brand means owning and polishing what is most essentially you. … Remember, it is not what we say, but what we do that counts. People want to know if you will backup your words with action. If your brand is the authentic you even when the spotlight is not shining,” Hightower said.   Hightower said she began developing her own personal brand when she was running the 100- and 60-meter hurdles at Ohio State.”I was working toward a singular feat: to compete in the Olympics. Everything in my mind, in my body, and in my soul in my activities was towards making the 1980 Olympic team,” she said. She said developing one’s personal brand was difficult, and destroying it is much easier. “Off the track is where they forget about building and protecting their image and uniqueness. There was the first offer of money from an endorsement deal, taken without thinking through who wrote the check. Then there was the first glow of the spotlight and the parties that followed, enjoyed without thinking about the national or international attention that comes with it,” she said.Hightower said it is never too late to start developing one’s personal brand, whether it is as a young adult in college or as someone with a steady career. “For those of you who are in college and for those of us who are in the market place and out here with jobs. This is still the primetime to start defining what your personal brand is,” she said. “None of us are too old to define what our personal brand is. … You need to take this opportunity in your life to define your brand, to build your brand, and most important to protect your brand.”last_img read more

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Lecture explores string theory

first_imgString theory, a so-called “theory of everything” in physics, is a popular topic among more than just scientists. Juan Maldacena, professor of theoretical and astrophysics at the Institute for Advanced Study and one of the foremost researchers in the field of string theory, delivered a lecture Wednesday on the subject of chromodynamics, string theory and black holes. Maldacena is most well-known for his 1997 paper on the large N limit of superconformal field theories and supergravity, which is the most-cited high energy physics paper of all time. Maldacena began his talk by discussing the close relationship between quantum chromodynamics, a type of quantum field theory, and gravity theories, namely quantum gravity. “The equality between these two things would be that the quantum field theory living on some space is equal to the quantum gravity living in the interior of that space,” Maldacena said. “The idea is that the physics in the interior can be described by the physics that happens on the boundary.” In particular, Maldacena discussed supersymmetric versions of this theory using the maximum number of supersymmetries, although these versions are difficult to experimentally confirm. One of the reasons for the maximum supersymmetry assumption in the theory is that is greatly simplifies the case and makes complicated physics a more tractable problem, Maldacena said. “There’s this joke about a farmer who had a cow, and he needed to increase milk production,” Maldacena said. “So he hires a veterinarian and a physicist to help him and the veterinarian tells him, ‘Well you should feed the cows better, exercise, blah, blah, blah.’ And then the physicist says, ‘Well, let’s first assume that we have a spherical cow.’ So this theory can be called a hyperbolic cow.” In order to work out these theories, Maldacena used anti-de Sitter’s space, which comes from the de Sitter space used to describe cosmological expansion. “In some sense, anti-de Sitter space is like a gravitational box that does not allow massive particles to reach the boundaries,” Maldacena said. “So if you sit in the middle of anti-de Sitter space and you throw a rock, after awhile the rock will come back to you. If you shoot a gun, then that’s not a very good idea.” Using this approach, a natural duality arises between quantum field and gravity theories, which allows researchers to investigate fundamental questions in physics, he said. “Duality in this relationship means, ‘Take some parameter, and when the parameter takes some set of values, say small ones, then one description is easy,’” Maldacena said. “‘Then if it takes another set of values, let’s large ones, then the other description is simple.’” When looking at systems of weakly-interacting gluons, essentially free ones, the string theory is the simplest description. When there are strongly-interacting gluons, the problem is still well-defined but difficult to analyze with string theory, in which case gravitational descriptions are better because the radius in the space is much larger. This leads to a good approximation of more complicated string theory by relatively simple gravity ones, Maldacena said. “The good thing that gravity does for us is it allows us to solve the quantum field theory in a simple way,” Maldacena said. “However, there are things that we can learn about gravity from the field theory. A particularly interesting thing is that it’s useful for understanding quantum aspects of a black hole.” Black holes are gravitational collapses, where nothing can escape once the event horizon, a sort of boundary of the black hole, is passed, Maldacena said. But according to quantum dynamics, they can emit radiation, where the temperature at which the radiation is emitted is inversely proportional to the size of the black hole. “This effect implies that the smaller you make the black hole, the hotter the temperature is,” he said. “You can have the paradoxical equation of a black hole that can be white. So you have white black holes.” In physics the notion is that whenever there’s a temperature, something is moving, Maldacena said, and one of the hot questions in the field is to describe what goes on in the interior of a black hole. Maldacena said these complex descriptions of black holes can also be applied in a more generalized way to hydrodynamics, underscoring the fundamental nature of his research and the discipline of physics as a whole. “As physicists, one of the laws of physics is that you take a problem and investigate by making it simpler,” Maldacena said.last_img read more

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Saint Mary’s offers new abroad programs

first_imgSaint Mary’s joined forces with four other Holy Cross colleges this summer to create the Holy Cross Global Education Consortium (HCGEC), which will enable the College to broaden its study abroad programs. Elaine Meyer-Lee, director of the College’s Center for Women’s Intercultural Leadership, said the consortium will increase study-abroad opportunities for students.   “It’s really the wave of the future how smaller schools, like us, can provide more quality options for our school and the resources that our faculty have,” Meyer-Lee said. The colleges in HCGEC include Holy Cross, Kings College in Pennsylvania, Stone Hill College in Massachusetts and Saint Edwards in Texas, Meyer-Lee said. In addition to the eight summer-study programs Saint Mary’s currently offers, Belles can now spend the summer studying in Peru, East Africa, or Spain and Morocco through Kings College. Meyer-Lee said the consortium enables Belles to study abroad in programs the College would not have been able to fill by itself. “And the Holy Cross family is just a very natural one that our students and [faculty] value,” Meyer-Lee said. “It’s kind of a formalizing of that relationship.” Saint Mary’s evaluated each program put forward by Kings College to make sure the options would fit students’ expectations and to prevent overlap among programs, Meyer-Lee said. “[They] didn’t overlap too much with what we already have and [provided] something sort of unique that would be attractive, so that’s in general why we opted into all three,” she said. The summer programs provide another option to students who have difficulty fitting semester-long programs into their major requirements, Meyer-Lee said. Some students who think they aren’t ready to go abroad for a whole semester also opt for the shorter summer programs, she said. “For some people, they do one of these at the beginning after their first year of study when they are kind of not sure yet, and often then they do find a way to spend a whole semester abroad because they get a taste of it and find it very compelling,” Meyer-Lee said. Saint Mary’s faculty members will be part of the teaching staff in the Peru and East Africa programs through Kings College, Meyer-Lee said. She said these faculty members can then bring this new knowledge back to their classrooms. “A wonderful value of the summer programs is that the faculties get to go, which then keeps them engaged internationally and able to bring those global perspectives to all the classes they teach,” Meyer-Lee said. Meyer-Lee said the consortium aligns with Saint Mary’s mission by encouraging assessment and understanding of the challenges of the contemporary world that Saint Mary’s women face. “Our mission within Saint Mary’s is to foster international competence, which is critical to empowering women, and to make a difference in the world,” Meyer-Lee said. “All of [the summer study-abroad programs] do that in one way or another. Contact Alex Winegar at awineg01@saintmarys.edulast_img read more

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Burglary suspect arrested in Port Arthur

first_imgA witness to a crime helped police in Port Arthur capture a burglary suspect Sunday night. Port Arthur Police received a call about a burglary in progress in the 1600 block of San Augustine Avenue at about 9:18 p.m. May 1. Officers were given a description of the suspect by a neighbor that was a witness and police searched the area and found a man fitting the description walking in the 1300 block of San Augustine Avenue, according to a press release from PAPD.The suspect was found in possession of property that police said was linked to the residence. He was arrested for burglary and was also found to have a parole violation warrant for his arrest.He was booked into the Jefferson County Correctional Facility. Police have not released the name of the suspect.last_img read more

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Port Neches kids’ lemonade stand helps ‘Grandma’ through cancer

first_img “We were going to do a lemonade stand and we figured we should raise money for her,” Taylor said after yelling at drivers to stop and buy tropical punch.It all started when Savannah stopped by Guidry’s  house near Sasser Lane during the summer. One visit turned to many others over time. Guidry made such an impression on Savannah and her sister, Kaeylin, that they decided to call her Grandma.Guidry told Savannah during one of her usual visits that she was due for a doctor’s appointment. Savannah asked why, and she told the curious Port Neches Middle School student that her cancer was spreading. “Everyone who has heard about this is amazed,” Guidry said. “It was such a generous thing to do, and they did it on their own.”The children have even touched others in the neighborhood and encouraged them to do their part.“One guy down the street found their sign to be a little small, so he donated a big sign so everyone could see it,” Guidry said.Guidry told her life-long friend, Patricia Gaspard about the children’s lemonade stand, and she was moved by their effort.“When I heard the story, I was so overwhelmed that someone they didn’t even know that long would do this,” Gaspard said. “It just floored me. And I want to tell their parents what a wonderful job they are doing. And it was a group effort.”One of the parents seems to already know.David Henry, Savannah and Kaelyn stepfather, said he couldn’t be more proud.“I’m surprised as heck,” Henry said. “They were out picking weeds, and now they’re raising money for her. It’s amazing.”Each day, as they learn how to make money transactions and as they help their neighbors beat the heat with refreshing drinks, they’re also learning the true essence of teamwork.“We take turns pouring, taking money and holding the sign,” Tori said. “No on is a leader.”So far their teamwork has carried them way over the initial $14 they first handed their grandmother. As of Tuesday, the group raised about $84.rbrown@panews.com “I had lymph nodes,” Guidry said. “I had to go to chemo, and I was about to give up and throw my hands up and say forget it, but that’s when I got a call from them.”Savannah, along with the other five kids stopped by the house with a surprise that she said turned her world upside-down.“They grabbed me by the legs and they hugged me,” Guidry said. “And they said, ‘we have a surprise’. She (Savannah) showed me the sign behind her back and you should have seen their little faces. That’s when they gave me $14.”For the past few weeks, the children, all neighbors, have been standing on the corner of the Sasser and Hampton Lane, in front of a little red wagon full of drinks, holding a sign that reads, “lemonade for our grandma…she has lung cancer” to raise money so Guidry can afford gas to go from Port Neches to M.D. Anderson Hospital in Houston on occasions.center_img Sometimes a small deed can make a big difference. Loynee Guidry, who was diagnosed with lung cancer recently, knows this very well. Ever since six kids decided to trade their afternoon playtime to help raise money for the soon-to-be 79 year old, the Port Neches resident has decided to look her cancer square in the eye and fight back with all she’s got.“I have a low 20 to 30 percent chance that the chemo (chemotherapy) is going to hold back the cancer from spreading any further, but I have to do it for my kids,” she said.When Savannah Dartez, 12, Logan Hammonds, 11, Taylor Melancon, 10, Tori Melancon, 8, Brylie Dartez, 6 and Kaelyn Dartez, 4, learned that their neighborhood “grandma” was ill, they were determined to help. The group put their heads together and came up with a plan.last_img read more

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Former PA streets dept. superintendent faces 46 counts

first_img After Edwards was arrested at his residence, he was transported to the Jefferson County Jail. Bond for the charges is set at $120,000.00.This is an ongoing investigation that involves both current and former employees from several divisions within the City of Port Arthur. Anyone having knowledge or information regarding these investigations is encouraged to come forward and contact Lt. M. Blitch at the Port Arthur Police Department or Assistant Chief M. Molfino at the Jefferson County District Attorney’s office. Three Port Arthur streets department employees were fired in October after an investigation indicated the trio had stolen gas on city-issued Fuelman cards.City Manager Brian McDougal at the time said an investigation into the theft allegations started about a month earlier, and three employees, Carlton Edwards, Steve Guidry and Randall Davis, were implicated. Guidry and Davis have not been arrested. Persons coming forward prior to being contacted or charged will be seen as assisting in the investigation and could receive consideration for their cooperation in this ongoing investigation.center_img Carleton Edwards, 49, the former superintendent of the Streets Division for the city of Port Arthur, was arrested Thursday on 46 counts of credit card abuse.A joint investigation between the Jefferson County District Attorney’s Office and the Port Arthur Police Department uncovered Edwards’ abuse of a city of Port Arthur owned credit card. Edwards is accused of abuse of the credit card during his tenure as superintendent, spanning from July 2014 through October 2015.last_img read more

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2 whooping cranes shot dead in Southeast Texas, possibly in Jefferson County

first_img A statement from then International Crane Foundation says the shootings happened Sunday in Hardin County, but state Game Warden Mike Boone said Wednesday in Kountze that the shootings happened just to the south in Jefferson County.No other details were available, but the foundation statement quoted Texas Parks and Wildlife Department officials as saying a suspect has been identified. Boone said no arrests had been made.The foundation says more than 20 whooping cranes have been shot and killed in the United States over the past five years, leaving about 600 whooping cranes in the world. The two cranes shot Sunday were part of a Louisiana flock that numbered about 30. KOUNTZE (AP) – Two endangered whooping cranes have been shot dead in Southeast Texas, and state game wardens have identified a suspect. Next Uplast_img read more