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Alex Newell, Eden Espinosa & Jessica Vosk to Share the Role of Narrator in 50th Anniversary Joseph Concert

first_imgAlex Newell, Eden Espinosa & Jessica Vosk(Photos: Emilio Madrid for Broadway.com | Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images | Michael Hull) View Comments Powerhouse stage stars Alex Newell, Eden Espinosa and Jessica Vosk have been selected to team up in the role of the Narrator in Manhattan Concert Productions’ upcoming one-night presentation of Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat. Michael Arden is at the helm of the previously announced concert, which will star Noah Galvin as Joseph, scheduled to take place at Lincoln Center’s David Geffen Hall on February 17, 2020 at 8:00pm.Newell, who made his Broadway debut in Once on This Island, appeared in Manhattan Concert Productions’ 2018 concert production of The Scarlet Pimpernel. Espinosa is known for her stage turns in Wicked, Falsettos, Brooklyn and Lempicka. Vosk, also a veteran of Wicked, recently concluded a turn in the world premiere musical Becoming Nancy at the Alliance Theatre.Marking the 50th anniversary of the 1970 amateur stage productions that gave Joseph its first life, the concert will feature a chorus of more than 200 singers from across the United States, a star-studded cast and the New York City Chamber Orchestra.Told entirely through song with the help of a Narrator (played by Newell, Espinosa and Vosk), the musical follows the story of Jacob’s favorite son, Joseph (Galvin), and his eleven brothers. After being sold into slavery by the brothers, he ingratiates himself with Egyptian noble Potiphar, but ends up in jail after refusing the advances of Potiphar’s wife. While imprisoned, Joseph discovers his ability to interpret dreams, and he soon finds himself in front of the mighty but troubled showman, the Pharaoh. As Joseph strives to resolve Egypt’s famine, he becomes Pharaoh’s right-hand man and eventually reunites with his family.Featuring music by Andrew Lloyd Webber and lyrics by Tim Rice, the show features songs that have gone on to become pop and musical-theater standards, including “Any Dream Will Do,” “Close Every Door to Me,” “Jacob and Sons,” “There’s One More Angel in Heaven” and “Go Go Go Joseph.”Additional casting for Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat will be announced at a later date. Noah Galvin Star Files Alex Newell Jessica Vosklast_img read more

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Vermont homes sales finally edge up in price

first_imgVermont home sales have been steadily rising over the last several months, but prices have actually gone down. In October, prices rebounded somewhat and were up over the same time last year. Meanwhile across the region, the residential market in New England year-over-year sales increased by 3.8 percent, according to The RE/MAX INTEGRA, New England October Monthly Housing Report. Pending sales were up 12.3 percent over October 2014 (Vermont 11.7 percent) while average days on market decreased by nearly 11 percent (Vermont nearly 14 percent). Vermont still had the highest DOM at 153. On a year-to-year basis, Vermont median homes sale prices were up $6,500 to $196,500 (3.4 percent).Month-over-month, the market followed traditional seasonal trends with a 6.6 percent decrease in sales and slight decreases in median price and pending sales.“There was little movement in the October market other than typical season declines in units & inventory,” said Dan Breault, EVP/Regional Director of RE/MAX INTEGRA, New England. “We’re seeing a strong market even as we move into the slower season.”· In Connecticut, the number of total transactions were up 0.8% year-over-year while median price increased 3.1%. Pending sales were up 13.5% year-over-year.· Maine showed a decrease of 1.1% in total transactions year-over-year. The median price increased 6.5% and pending sales were up 14.9%, the second highest in New England.· Massachusetts showed an increase of 6.2% in total transactions year-over-year. The median price was up 4.0%. Pending sales were up 11.6% over October 2014.· In New Hampshire, home transactions increased 8.8% year-over-year, once again the highest in New England, and median price increased 2.7%. Pending sales were down 6.6% year-over-year.· Rhode Island home transactions increased 4.6% year-over-year, while median price decreased 0.4%. Pending sales were up 28.3% year-over-year, once again the highest in New England.· Vermont home transactions were up 1.9% year-over-year, while median price increased 3.4% year-over-year. Pending sales were up 11.7% year-over-year.Transactions are the total number of closed residential (Single Family and Condo) transactions during the given month. Median Sales Price is the median price of all specified properties sold during the specified time period. MLS data is provided by contracted data aggregators, RE/MAX brokerages and regional offices. While MLS data is believed to be accurate, it cannot be guaranteed. MLS data is constantly being updated, making any analysis a snapshot at a particular time. All raw data remains the intellectual property of each local MLS organization.Source: RE/MAX 11.18.2015last_img read more

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Trial Lawyers Section to work for court funding

first_img October 1, 2008 Kim MacQueen Associate Editor Regular News Trial Lawyers Section to work for court funding Trial Lawyers Section to work for court funding Associate EditorTrial lawyers know firsthand just how disruptive the judiciary’s current budget crisis has been, and how badly things are likely to get, should the funding be cut again. Trials are expensive during any economic climate. With every court in the state struggling to work with fewer dollars and staff, they’re becoming even harder to come by. Frank Bedell is chair of the Trial Lawyers Section of The Florida Bar, and while it can be hard for the uninitiated to see the effects of budget cuts to the court system just yet, he’s starting to see the evidence. The section has worked hard in the past to educate legislators on the importance of funding the judiciary, and counts this as one of its most important initiatives going forward, because “it has a direct impact on the ability of courts to effectively administer justice.”“It’s had an effect on our section, on our clients — on everybody in the state of Florida. If cases aren’t moving as quickly, you have mothers looking for child support who can’t get it; you have fathers looking for visitation rights who can’t get them; banks can’t foreclose on loans; tenants can’t defend themselves; landlords can’t evict them….”The grandson of famous Florida litigator Chester Bedell, Frank Bedell recounted watching the judiciary budget crisis “evolve from a very real but somewhat abstract concept of what it would mean, to budget cuts being put into place, and seeing how the courthouses are having to react and how that filters down to the parties themselves. A slowdown in the court system affects everyone, not just litigators. It has direct impact on the people on the ground. It affects our clients and their rights.”Bob Palmer, immediate past section chair, had the same point to make.“The court budget is already such a small percentage of the state budget, and has been cut twice last year,” Palmer said. “And as a result, what’s happening is it’s taking longer to get a hearing, in part because you’ve got judges stretched too thin, having to spend time on programs that, in the past, were fully staffed.”Palmer and executive committee member Tim Sullivan echoed Bedell’s assertion that educating legislators and helping to protect court funding was a top section priority for the coming year.“There is so much pressure on the Legislature to run the state with less money,” Sullivan said, “but the court system already runs so lean it’s not a place for them to look to find excess funds. There truly aren’t any.”Other plans for the future include a new, revamped section Web site (www.flatls.org) meant to be a one-stop shop for Florida trial lawyers, which Palmer expected to go live within the next two months. And because it can be difficult and time-consuming to get a case through the trial process even in the best of times, another section priority is the Advanced Trial Advocacy Seminar, offered every spring. The seminar offers CLE credit to both new and experienced litigators and is a feather in the section’s cap as it prepares to celebrate its 25th anniversary of board certification this coming year.“It’s an effective forum where people can go and do an opening statement, or do a closing statement…and it’s videotaped right then and there. And that videotape doesn’t lie,” Bedell said, crediting the experienced lawyers and some judges who give up days of their lives every year to help other litigators get the quality practice they need. Successful participation in the seminar earns credit toward board certification — especially important during times when it’s harder to get into the courtroom to get that experience.“It’s harder and harder to get trials, so fewer and fewer attorneys are eligible for board certification, and participation in the seminar counts as credit toward certification,” Palmer said. “The seminar gives you trial experience that, right now — even without the judicial crisis — it might take five or maybe 10 years to get.”last_img read more

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Gophers stumble in season finale

first_imgGophers stumble in season finaleMinnesota limited Michigan State but couldn’t score on offense. Amanda SnyderMinnesota defensive lineman Ra’shede Hageman moves to tackle a Hawkeye Saturday Sept. 28, 2013 at TCF Bank Stadium. Dane MizutaniDecember 2, 2013Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintEAST LANSING, Mich. — Ra’Shede Hageman was visibly disappointed after the Gophers’ 14-3 loss to Michigan State on Saturday.Hageman hung his head and tightly grasped the straps of his backpack as reporters filled the space around him after the game.“I definitely didn’t want to go out [with a loss],” Hageman said of his last Big Ten game.His defense had just capped another impressive performance, but for the second week in a row, it had a loss to show for its effort.Minnesota’s offense struggled for the second consecutive week in the game against the Spartans, leaving Hageman contemplating how he could have made a bigger impact in the game.“‘Should I have picked that ball up [and tried to score]?’” he said in reference to his fumble recovery in the game. “I feel like the defense had … to contribute to scoring.”That feeling has been magnified lately. The Gophers haven’t scored a touchdown on offense in the last 10 quarters.Still, Hageman shouldered a lot of the blame after the loss to the Spartans.“It’s up to the defense to make plays,” he said. “It’s all about making plays.”The Gophers’ defense forced a pair of turnovers in the game but never had the full support of the offense.Minnesota limited Michigan State to 324 yards of total offense, but its own offensive unit never got into a groove against a stout Spartans defense.The Gophers amassed just 249 yards of total offense, but junior running back David Cobb did his part, finishing with 101 yards against the No. 1 rushing defense in the nation.“We moved the ball,” said head coach Jerry Kill. “We just didn’t finish drives. … We just need to make a few more plays.”Cobb said the offense has to improve its efficiency in the red zone.The Gophers got inside the opposing 20-yard line three times in Saturday’s game and had only a field goal to show for it. “We can’t leave our defense on the field like that,” Cobb said. “I feel like the defense played great, and we have to come up with more points.”The Spartans scored twice — once at the start of the game and again at the beginning of the second half. That proved to be the difference.While the Gophers have lost the last two games, Kill said he’s been satisfied with the physicality his team has showcased in both losses.Minnesota showed more fight against Wisconsin a week ago and Michigan State this weekend than it has in recent memory. It only lost to those two teams by a combined 24 points after losing by a combined 36 points in 2011 and 41 points in 2012. “We showed that we’re a physical football team that can play against any style of offense,” junior cornerback Derrick Wells said of the last two weeks.There has been a noticeable shift this season — a shift Hageman said happened after a tough loss to Michigan at the start of the Big Ten schedule.The team came together after that loss and “kind of caught a groove,” he said.“We went on that four-game winning streak,” Hageman said, “[and] we identified who we were.”That fueled the team down the stretch, and it won four of its last six games.Amid the moral victories of the last two weeks, the games have also showed that this team still has room to grow. That growth will come over the next month in preparation for a bowl game for the second year in a row.“We’re definitely excited about going to a bowl game, but we’re not satisfied with losing to Wisconsin or Michigan State,” Cobb said, “because we felt like we had opportunities to win both games.”While frustrated that his final Big Ten game ended with a loss, Hageman took solace in the fact that it wasn’t the last game of his career.“If we weren’t bowl-eligible, the season would really be over, so the fact that we have another game to prepare for is always a good feeling,” he said.Kill has said all season that this team has come along faster than even he expected. He said it again Saturday and gave all the credit to his players.“We gave a great effort and came up short and we feel bad about that … but we know we’re still playing,” Kill said. “There’s still an opportunity to accomplish a lot this season.”last_img read more

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Sad leaders often achieve better outcomes than angry leaders

first_imgShare on Facebook Share on Twitter As expected, angry leaders were viewed as having higher levels of different types of position power. This includes being legitimately instated over others, having the right to give or withhold rewards and coercive power to punish others. Followers hence seem to think that leaders displaying anger, in comparison to leaders showing sadness, more strongly stress their legitimate position within the hierarchy of an organization and the control over punishment and reward that is available to them. When it comes to personal power, however, leaders displaying sadness seem to appeal to followers more strongly.“Subordinates form impressions of their leaders when they view their displays of emotion in negative work situations”, says Schwarzmüller, who believes leaders should consciously reflect on the emotions they display.She says that although leaders might benefit from stressing their legitimate power, displays of anger could backfire as they cause subordinates to infer that their “boss” has strong coercive power but weak referent power. Referent power refers to the ability of a leader to influence followers by making them identify and sympathize with him or her, and is a crucial prerequisite for ensuring followers’ loyalty and commitment.Showing sadness comes at a cost too, as it often reduces a leader’s legitimate power. It has its benefits, however, as it decreases leaders’ assumed power to punish – a power base that negatively affects leadership outcomes.“Although angry leaders might be considered more powerful in general, their resulting power seems to rest upon a weak foundation”, says Schwarzmüller. Email Leaders often believe that they should show anger to make subordinates more compliant, thinking they will then be seen as more effective at work or within their organization. They also feel it is bad if they show emotions such as sadness. While it is true that angry leaders are perceived by others to wield more power, followers warm more easily to those showing more vulnerable emotions, says Tanja Schwarzmüller of the Technical University of Munich in Germany.This study, published in Springer’s Journal of Business and Psychology, wants to find out how perceptions about leaders’ power bases might explain why angry leaders are considered to be more powerful than sad leaders, yet still score lower on their leadership report cards.Schwarzmüller and her colleagues conducted three sets of experiments. In the first two, groups of students or working adults assessed videos depicting angry and sad leaders. In the third, an online survey showing relevant photographs was used.center_img Pinterest Share LinkedInlast_img read more

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Study hints at complex interaction of resistant microbes, antibiotics

first_imgDrug-resistant bacteria are a well-documented problem in nursing homes. Residents are frail and prone to infection, and antibiotic use is common. That’s one of the reasons public health officials and infectious disease experts believe nursing homes are a critical target for stewardship programs that promote more prudent use of antibiotics.But a new study from researchers at the University of Michigan suggests that these programs could be hindered by a focus on individual species of multidrug-resistant organism (MDRO) and certain antibiotic classes that may fuel that resistance.The reality, the researchers say, is that nursing homes are likely filled with multiple MDROs simultaneously interacting with antibiotics and with each other in complex ways that can influence the dynamics of patient colonization and increase the likelihood of infection. Their study scratches at the surface of this drug-resistant ecosystem.”One of the major ways these organisms are evolving is through resistance to antibiotics, and we’ve known that,” corresponding author Evan Snitkin, PhD, a microbiologist at the University of Michigan Medical School, said in an interview. “But something else they’re seeing in addition to antibiotics is each other.”They’re all circulating through these facilities simultaneously, and that opens the potential that they might be interacting with one another, whether by coincidence or by evolved mechanism, and our results hint at that.”MDROs ‘ubiquitous’ in nursing homesFor the study, Snitkin and his colleagues retrospectively analyzed data from 234 residents at 12 community nursing homes in Michigan. The data, collected from May 2010 through April 2013, came from a larger study on bacterial colonization and antibiotic exposure in nursing home residents over time.Snitkin and his colleagues focused on patients who had had a urinary catheter for at least 3 days—a population with a high risk of developing urinary tract infections (UTIs). “These are some of the highest risk individuals in nursing homes,” Snitkin said.Focusing on this group allowed the researchers to look at patterns of urinary tract infections and which MDROs might be associated with them.The MDROs most commonly found to be colonizing these patients were vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Nearly a quarter of the nursing home residents (23.5%) were colonized with at least one of these organisms, while 20.9% were colonized with two species and 20% were colonized with more than two species.Although previous studies have shown that drug-resistant pathogens are prevalent in nursing homes, Snitkin said he was surprised by these results. “I was really surprised that, outside the ICU setting in a hospital, antibiotic-resistant organisms would be so ubiquitous, and to find patients colonized with multiple organisms simultaneously was even more intriguing to me,” he said.Colonization patterns emergeThe team then constructed models to figure out what was influencing acquisition of each of these organisms. The high frequency of multi-MDRO colonization, it turns out, was not random.In fact, the presence of certain MDROs in colonized individuals made it more likely that they would be colonized by another drug-resistant bug. Patients colonized with P mirabilis, for example, had more than two times the risk of also acquiring VRE, MRSA, A baumannii, and E coli, while patients with E coli, A baumannii, and P aeruginosa had an increased risk of acquiring P mirabilis.Snitkin and his colleagues also found that exposure to individual antibiotic classes was associated with increased risk of acquiring certain pathogens, and in some cases multiple species. Over the course of the study, 146 of the residents received at least one course of treatment with 1 of 50 antibiotics. Patients treated with aminoglycosides were found to have more than five times the risk of being colonized with A baumannii, and more than three times the risk of acquiring E coli. Treatment with nitrofurans increased the risk of acquiring VRE threefold and P mirabilis eightfold. And multiple antibiotics were found to increase the risk of a single MDRO.From these findings, the researchers were able to create a map of interactions that showed that all MDRO colonization in the patients, except for MRSA, was positively associated with at least one antibiotic and one other MDRO. Antibiotic exposure increased nursing home residents’ risk of initially acquiring a primary MDRO, which in turn influenced the risk of colonization with another MDRO. This observation led them to ask whether these interactions were influencing risk of infection. Their subsequent analysis of 70 patients with UTIs indicated that co-colonization with certain pairs of species, like P mirabilis and E coli, was linked to increased risk for UTIs, a finding that suggests enhanced pathogenic potential when the two bacteria are both present in a patient. Co-occurrence of E coli and VRE, and P mirabilis and MRSA, was also associated with increased the risk of UTI.Complex web of interactionsSnitkin said all the findings point to a complex web of interactions among drug-resistant organisms and antibiotics. “It’s not just antibiotics but interactions with one another that are driving acquisition and infection,” he said.And what this interconnectivity means, he added, is that stewardship programs in nursing homes and other long-term care facilities will need to take a network-based approach to tackling the underlying MDRO burden, rather than focusing on restricting use of certain antibiotics to reduce individual organisms.”If the objective is to control the overall burden of resistance in a facility, then maybe taking a single-organism view of stewardship might not fulfill that objective,” he said. “The impact of limiting the use of one antibiotic in favor of another will have many downstream influences that could counterintuitively increase the overall burden.”Snitkin notes that for now this is just one study in one set of nursing homes, and that further research will be needed in other nursing homes and other types of healthcare facilities to determine how robust the findings are and understand how these interaction networks might change depending on what organisms are circulating and what antibiotics are being used. “If we see the same patterns over and over again, then we’ll have a basis to start influencing stewardship,” he said.In September 2016, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services finalized a rule that requires more than 15,000 long-term care facilities (nursing homes, skilled-nursing facilities, and assisted-living facilities) to have antibiotic stewardship programs. With the lack of antibiotic stewardship expertise at many of these facilities, developing and maintaining these programs is expected to be a challenge.See also:Sep 12 Proc Natl Acad Sci USA studylast_img read more

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Clarks to ‘modernise’ portfolio

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Haiti records More COVID Deaths

first_img More deaths from COVID-19 recorded in CARICOM countries,… The Ministry of Public Health in its daily bulletin, gave no details as to what part of the country the victims had come from, but said that there were 106 new cases of the virus, bringing the total to 4 547 since the first case was detected on March 19. Oct 16, 2020 Oct 16, 2020 Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… Six Eastern Caribbean countries deemed safe for travel – CDC CMO says Saint Lucia at critical stage of COVID-19 outbreak (Barbados Nation) The death toll from the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic reached 80 on Wednesday as Haiti recorded four more deaths over the past 24 hours. Read more at: Barbados Nationcenter_img Meanwhile, the authorities said that the number of active cases, excluding those who have healed or died, is growing twice the rate as in neighbouring country of the Dominican Republic, where 23 686 positive cases and 615 deaths have been recorded. It said active cases were now 4 443, an increase of 102 over the last 24 hours. Guyana, Haiti, Belize record deaths from COVID-19Three CARICOM countries, including Guyana, have recorded deaths associated with the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, according to health authorities. Guyana’s death toll reached 76 after the country recorded two more deaths late Saturday. The Ministry of Health in a statement noted that the latest fatalities included a 36 -year-old male from…September 28, 2020In “General”Saint Lucia records first COVID-19 case in over a monthStory via CMC – St. Lucia recorded its first positive case for more than a month while Jamaica and Haiti recorded deaths from the coronavirus (COVID-19) over the last 24 hours. The health authorities in Jamaica said six additional COVID-19 related deaths and 196 new cases had been recorded in…October 12, 2020In “General”Bahamas, Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago record deaths from COVID-19The Bahamas and Jamaica recorded deaths from the coronavirus (COVID-19) as several other Caribbean Community (CARICOM) countries reported new cases of the virus over the past 24 hours. The Ministry of Health said that there were 65 new cases of COVID-19 and two additional deaths. As a result the total number…September 30, 2020In “General”Share this on WhatsApp Oct 15, 2020 You may be interested in… St. Lucia records more cases of COVID Oct 15, 2020last_img read more

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WGC 2015 kicks off in Paris

first_imgThe official opening ceremony of the 26th World Gas Conference (WGC) Paris was held today, June 2 in the large amphitheater in the Palais des Sports at the Porte de Versailles.The ceremony was opened with a welcoming address by Jérôme Ferrier, President of the International Gas Union, the organizer of the World Gas Conference which is being held every three years.After IGU’s president welcoming address, CEO’s of oil and gas giants Engie, formerly known as GDF Suez, and Total took the stage delivering their host speeches to the WGC audience in the Palais des Sports at the Porte de Versailles.French Republican Guard orchestra also performed during the opening ceremony of the World Gas Conference which runs from June 1 to June 5.According to IGU, the focus of the conference will be to highlight the crucial role that gas will play in the future world growth, especially given the growing demand for green sources of energy.More than 3500 delegates from all over the world are registered to attend WGC this year from more than 600 organisations. LNG World News Staff; Images: WGC 2015last_img read more

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Windy work for Crane Rental

first_imgCrane Rental received the wind farm components at a rail spur, where it loaded the 89.4-tonne nacelle and 34.9-tonne hub onto Goldhofer trailers using a 550-tonne capacity Grove GMK-7550 truck crane.On arrival at the training facility, Crane Rental offloaded the nacelle and hub to a staging platform so that they could be assembled and slid into position inside a building, where the nacelles will be used to train Siemens Energy employees.Positioning the assembled equipment, which weighed a total of 142.4 tonnes, inside the building required Crane Rental to use its proprietary jack and slide system with 91.5 m of total track.Crane Rental Corporation is a member of the Cargo Equipment Experts (CEE) network for the USA.  www.cranerental.comwww.cargoequipmentexperts.comlast_img read more