Posted in akidgsvmlsry

Odds & Ends: Andy Mientus to Rock Out in Denver Production of Tommy & More

first_img View Comments Andy Mientus(Photo: Bruce Glikas) Here’s a quick roundup of stories you may have missed today. Andy Mientus to Rock Out in Denver Production of TommyBroadway alum Andy Mientus (Spring Awakening) has been announced as the star of a new Colorado mounting the 1993 musical Tommy, featuring the Tony-winning music of iconic rock band The Who. Mientus will take on the title role in the production directed by Tony nominee Sam Buntrock (Sunday in the Park with George) and choreographed by Katie Spelman (Amélie). Tommy will run at the Denver Center for the Performing Arts’ Stage Theatre from April 20 through May 27. Joining Mientus onstage will be Tony nominee Charl Brown (Motown) as Captain Walker, Carson Elrod (Peter and the Starcatcher) as Uncle Ernie, Betsy Morgan (Sweeney Todd) as Mrs. Walker and Lulu Fall (The Great Comet) as Acid Queen. The cast will also include David Hess, Sara Kapner, Gareth Keegan, Charlie Korman, Corbin Payne, Terence Reddick, Tristan Champion Regini, Timothy John Smith, Olivia Sullivent, Erin Willis, Owen Zitek, Samuel Bird, Radley Wright, Joe Beauregard and Katie Drinkard.Laura Benanti to Co-Host 33rd Annual Lucille Lortel AwardsTony winner, off-Broadway alum and Melania Trump impersonator Laura Benanti has signed on as co-host of the 2018 Lucille Lortel Awards, toasting the best off-Broadway theater debuting in the 2017-2018 season. Joining Benanti as co-emcee will be Jason Jones, co-creator of the TBS comedy series The Detour (in which Benanti appears). The Lortel Awards are slated to take place at NYU’s Skirball Center on May 6 at 7:00pm. Nominations will be announced on April 4.Idina Menzel to Receive Drama League Award for Distinguished AchievementTony-winning Wicked original Idina Menzel (who will return to the stage this spring in Skintight) is among the special honorees receiving a hat-tip at the 84th Annual Drama League Awards. The starry ceremony will take place at the Marriott Marquis Times Square on May 18 at 11:30am. Menzel will be presented with Distinguished Achievement in Musical Theater Award alongside Tony-winning director/choreographer Casey Nicholaw (Mean Girls), who’ll receive the Founders Award for Excellence in Directing. The National Endowment for the Arts will also be honored by the Drama League with the Unique Contribution to the Theater Award. Nominees for the Drama League’s esteemed Distinguished Performance Award will be announced on April 18.New Book Something Wonderful: Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Broadway Revolution Set for April ReleaseGear up for the Broadway revival of Carousel with a new tome about the legendary songwriters Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II. Henry Holt and Company has announced Something Wonderful: Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Broadway Revolution, a new book by Todd S. Purdum offering an inside look at the personalities of R&H, their relationship with each other, their creative process and their groundbreaking innovations. In addition to Carousel, Rodgers and Hammerstein’s musicals include South Pacific, Oklahoma!, The Sound of Music, Cinderella and The King and I, the tuner from which the book gets its title. Something Wonderful: Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Broadway Revolution is slated for an April 3 release.Tony Nominee Denée Benton to Lead CBS Pilot 25Denée Benton, the super talent who blew audiences away with her Tony-nommed Broadway debut in The Great Comet, has been cast in 25, a comedy-series pilot from CBS, according to Deadline. Emily Osment (Young & Hungry) and Matt Shively (The Real O’Neals) will co-star. 25 follows twentysomething Kyle (Shively), who travels to Austin to convince his friend Kate (Osment) that they are meant to be. Benton will play Kate’s roommate, Morgan. Look back at our Fresh Face video with Benton below and cross your fingers that 25 is picked up as a full series. P.S. Get ready for NBC’s starry Easter Sunday presentation of Jesus Christ Superstar Live in Concert with this new promo.last_img read more

Posted in akidgsvmlsry

Orlando Workers’ Comp judge needed

first_img Orlando Workers’ Comp judge needed The Statewide Nominating Committee for Judges of Compensation Claims is accepting applications for a Judge of Compensation Claims for the Orlando District.Applicants must submit one original completed application and one copy to the SNCJCC Committee chair, and one additional copy to each commission member no later than 5 p.m. June 11.The Commission will hold a public hearing June 22 at 9 a.m. at the Hyatt Regency Orlando International Airport Hotel to interview the applicants.A copy of the judicial application along with a listing of all SNCJCC Commission Members is posted at www.jcc.state.fl.us and www.floridabar.org.Questions should be directed to Victor Marrero, Committee Chair, Director of Risk Management, Broward Sheriff’s Office, Ft. Lauderdale 33312, telephone (954) 831-8358, fax (954) 321-4587. May 15, 2007 Regular News Orlando Workers’ Comp judge neededlast_img read more

Posted in akidgsvmlsry

With new rules, few public health labs to handle riskiest agents

first_imgDec 13, 2012 (CIDRAP News) – With tougher security requirements set to take effect next April, few state public health laboratories plan to maintain stocks of certain pathogens considered most tempting to bioterrorists, according to the Association of Public Health Laboratories (APHL) and officials with state labs.Pathogens such as Bacillus anthracis, Ebola virus, and several others have been designated “Tier 1″ agents on the Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS’s) list of select agents and toxins. Come Apr 3, labs that want to keep samples of Tier 1 agents on hand will have to meet special rules for personnel screening and physical security, on top of those already required by the Select Agent Program.Some lab directors describe the extra requirements as burdensome.A recent informal survey by the APHL suggested that only a few labs will take the trouble to register as Tier 1 labs, said Chris N. Mangal, MPH, the association’s director of public health preparedness and response.”We did a quick survey, and what we’ve seen so far is only about six of our labs indicated they’d have an interest in pursuing Tier 1 registration,” Mangal told CIDRAP News. She said all six were state labs.Labs participating in the HHS Select Agent Program were supposed to notify the agency last week whether they planned to seek Tier 1 registration. If they don’t go that route, they will have to get rid of their Tier 1 samples by April.Mangal and some other lab experts say that with only a few labs holding Tier 1 registration, the nation’s lab capacity could fall short in the event of another bioterrorist incident like the anthrax letter attacks of 2001. Others, though, are less concerned.Labs not registered to handle Tier 1 agents will still be able to test for and detect them, with the help of control strains that are not dangerous, Mangal and others said. But if they find one of the agents, they will have only 7 days to either destroy the sample or ship it to a lab with Tier 1 credentials.The 7-day deadline means those labs will have difficulty doing further analysis of Tier 1 agents, such as DNA fingerprinting, which would probably be required if deliberate release of an agent was suspected.”I don’t believe that the Tier 1 select agent requirements will limit their [labs’] ability to perform the initial testing for threat agents,” said Mangal. “Where this new regulation becomes a problem is the additional characterization that is typically needed for evidentiary purposes.”Besides Ebola virus and B anthracis, which causes anthrax, Tier 1 agents are Francisella tularensis (the cause of tularemia), Marburg virus, variola major and minor viruses (smallpox), Yersinia pestis (plague), Clostridium botulinum and botulinum toxin (botulism), Burkholderia mallei (glanders), and Burkholderia pseudomallei (melioidosis).Mangal said that during the 2001 anthrax episode, the Laboratory Response Network (LRN), which then included about 60 labs, ran more 1 million tests. She wonders if, in the event of a similar emergency, the burden of testing would fall mostly on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta and the Department of Homeland Security’s National Biodefense Forensic Analysis Center in Maryland.”Back in 2001 we saw how many samples came through and the vast amount of surge and storage space required,” she said. “What would happen if something like that happened again? . . . A surge in samples could possibly overwhelm the limited labs that would be at Tier 1.”The LRN for Biological Threat Preparedness and Response, which now includes about 165 labs, is designated by the CDC and APHL to respond to potential bioterrorism events and other infectious disease threats. Mangal said the APHL worked successfully to ensure that LRN members would not have to qualify for Tier 1 in order to stay in the network.There have been indications that HHS and the US Department of Agriculture, which administers a separate Select Agent Program, might suspend some of the Tier 1 rules in an emergency, allowing labs to keep agents longer, according to Mangal.CDC spokesman Jason McDonald agreed that that could happen. He said the federal Bioterrorism Act allows the HHS secretary to exempt a facility from the Select Agent Program regulations if the step is judged necessary because of a public health emergency.Rules resentedOne state lab official who resents the new Tier 1 rules is Joanne Bartkus, PhD, director of the Minnesota Department of Health’s (MDH’s) Public Health Laboratory in St. Paul.Bartkus said her lab plans to seek Tier 1 registration. “We felt it was important to maintain the capability to work with these agents,” she said. “We felt that keeping the bugs for a week is not really long enough. If we don’t maintain that capability, it’s gone, possibly forever. So we’ve been assessing the regulations, and we have a project plan in place to fill any gaps. We feel it’s doable.”Referring to the Tier 1 agents, Bartkus said, “These are all naturally occurring diseases that we have to deal with from a public health perspective.”As an example of the kind of problems the new rules might cause, she sketched a hypothetical scenario: Someone in Fargo, N.D., gets sick with anthrax. A week after identifying B anthracis, the North Dakota lab, following the rules, destroys the isolate. Then an anthrax case crops up in Moorhead, Minn., just across the border. With North Dakota’s isolate destroyed, there’s no way to tell if the cases are linked.Bartkus concurred with Mangal that labs need more than a week to do specialized analysis of biological agents. Besides DNA fingerprinting, such work can include steps like antimicrobial susceptibility testing and, in the case of botulism, mouse bioassays to identify the type of botulinum toxin.She believes that forcing labs to get rid of their samples of Tier 1 agents will ultimately diminish their capabilities.”We’ll still have capability and capacity, but to take away the ability to work on agents that are historical isolates because somebody has decided they can be used for bioterrorism” is questionable, she said.”I think it makes much more sense to treat everything the same way, than to focus on a few agents that I have heard someone refer to as ‘your grandfather’s bioterrorism agent.'”Bartkus called the requirement to transfer or destroy Tier 1 agent samples “a fairly onerous, burdensome, and probably unwarranted regulation. And I’m a regulator.”Who needs Tier 1 registration?David A. Butcher, MBA, director of the Laboratory Services Division of the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, has quite a different view of the Tier 1 rules. His lab will not seek registration to hold Tier 1 agents.”I don’t think it’s necessary to be a Tier 1 lab,” he said. “You don’t need to store these agents in your lab. Under the rule you have 7 days to confirm them or transfer or destroy them, and that’s easily accomplished in 7 days. You don’t really need a repository of those organisms unless you’re a research facility.””I don’t feel this in any diminishes our capability,” he said. He added that the CDC provides surrogate organisms that are not select agents but mimic them and can be used in testing.Butcher is president-elect of the APHL, but said he was speaking only for himself.”I haven’t heard anyone clearly articulate why they think we do need them [Tier 1 agents],” Butcher said. “I guess they think they need to periodically test against the real organism. Here in Colorado, Yersinia pestis is endemic, so we see it all the time. We occasionally see Burkholderia; we occasionally see Brucella.”He agreed, however, that the 7-day deadline would hamper advanced analysis of agents.Burtcher said the Select Agent Program is “very burdensome” for state labs, and the Tier 1 rules make it even more so.”The biggest burden with Tier 1, and why everyone is upset, is that rule on personnel reliability,” he said. “You have to have a program in place to qualify and do an ongoing assessment of people, essentially their mental capacity. Would they have a propensity to do something illegal involving select agents?”He blames the requirement on the 2001 anthrax attacks and the government’s finding that scientist Bruce Ivins, PhD, was the perpetrator.Butcher voiced doubt that the personnel reliability program required with the Tier 1 rules would be approved by Colorado’s human resources department. “I definitely wouldn’t be able to get it in place by the Apr 3 deadline,” he added.His lab got rid of its Tier 1 agent samples last April, as part of its response to the last inspection by the Select Agent Program, he said. The decision was prompted by the need to reduce the lab’s regulatory burden. “I’ve been an outspoken advocate of not keeping the agents,” he added.North Carolina also opts outAnother state that will not seek Tier 1 credentials for its public health labs is North Carolina.”We’ve decided, based on the changes in the rules, not to pursue Tier 1 status at this time,” said Lou Turner, DrPH, acting public health laboratory director for the state. North Carolina operates one central lab and two regional labs, she noted.The reason for the decision is the “onerous” requirements for personnel reliability and physical security and the resulting costs, she said. A new state lab is about to open, and it would need retrofitting to meet the physical security standards.Turner doesn’t think the lack of Tier 1 registration will hurt the labs’ capabilities. “Our critical point was making sure we’d be able to serve our usual partner groups such as the FBI,” she said. “They’ve told us it was not necessary to be a Tier 1 lab. They would still use the state labs as long as they’re still select agent labs.”We’ll still be able to identify the agents. If we do, we have to refer them to a Tier 1 lab and destroy any materials. We’re perfectly confident of our ability to do that.”Turner said she’s not concerned about a decrease in lab capabilities nationwide as a result of the new rules. But she does wonder if states that don’t have Tier 1 status will eventually receive less CDC lab support through the public health emergency preparedness program.She said there are no signs of such a change, but said, “You never know what the mindset would be later, once these decisions are made and they see the landscape of who is where.”Minnesota’s Bartkus expressed less concern about the extra requirements for Tier 1 labs, compared with Butcher and Turner. She said Minnesota’s lab already meets the physical security requirements, and she doesn’t believe the personnel reliability rules will be a major problem.”One thing a little more vexing is the Internet or IT [information technology] requirements,” she said. The CDC wants certain IT resources protected, and MDH officials are still assessing that.Bartkus said there is some concern about the related costs and the MDH’s ability to meet the standards by April. She said she was hoping that the CDC would promise additional funds for labs that achieve Tier 1 status, which she said is the case for Level 1 labs in the LRN for Chemical Threats.”Those that decide to maintain Tier 1 are pretty much on their own,” she said.See also: Oct 10 CIDRAP News story “Changes in select agent rules concern public health labs”last_img read more

Posted in akidgsvmlsry

Attorney General Hector Balderas Urges Congress To Take Action To Protect Integrity Of America’s Elections

first_imgALBUQUERQUE — In expressing his “significant concern regarding the persistent threats to our election systems,” Attorney General Hector Balderas joined 21 attorneys general around the country to urge Congress to take action to protect the integrity of America’s elections. The attorneys general note warnings that “our election systems have been a target for foreign adversaries and that those same adversaries are currently working to undermine the upcoming elections.” Their letter follows confirmed reports that Russia successfully breached election systems in Florida, installed malware on a voting-systems software company used by North Carolina, and targeted the election systems of all 50 states in 2016. New Mexico Attorney General Hector Balderas Joining Attorney General Balderas in the letter are the attorneys general of California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Iowa, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Nevada, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, and Washington. Today’s letter follows up on a similar letter that attorneys general from 21 states sent to Congress in July 2018. AG News: “Make no mistake; our elections were attacked by Russian operatives in 2016, and they will be attacked again,” Balderas said. “Congress has a responsibility to take substantive steps to protect the integrity of our elections. The fate of our democracy is at stake.” In a letter addressed to key U.S. Senators, Attorney General Balderas and the other attorneys general ask Congress to provide additional election security grants to states and localities, support the establishment of cybersecurity and audit standards for election systems, and pass bipartisan election-security legislation.last_img read more

Posted in akidgsvmlsry

Trump to issue stop-payment order on health care subsidies

first_imgObamaCare is a broken mess. Piece by piece we will now begin the process of giving America the great HealthCare it deserves!— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) October 13, 2017The Department of Health and Human Services had made the announcement in a statement late Thursday. “We will discontinue these payments immediately,” said acting HHS Secretary Eric Hargan and Medicare administrator Seema Verma. Sign-up season for subsidized private insurance starts Nov. 1, in less than three weeks, with about 9 million people currently covered.In a separate statement, the White House said the government cannot legally continue to pay the so-called cost-sharing subsidies because they lack a formal authorization by Congress. Officials said a legal opinion from the Justice Department supports that conclusion.MORE: Calling it a beginning, Trump signs health care orderHowever, the administration had been making the payments from month to month, even as Trump threatened to cut them off to force Democrats to negotiate over health care. The subsidies help lower copays and deductibles for people with modest incomes.Halting the payments would trigger a spike in premiums for next year, unless Trump reverses course or Congress authorizes the money. The next payments are due around Oct. 20.The top two Democrats in Congress sharply denounced the Trump plan in a joint statement.“It is a spiteful act of vast, pointless sabotage leveled at working families and the middle class in every corner of America,” said House and Senate Democratic leaders Nancy Pelosi of California and Chuck Schumer of New York. “Make no mistake about it, Trump will try to blame the Affordable Care Act, but this will fall on his back and he will pay the price for it.”The president’s action is likely to trigger a lawsuit from state attorneys general, who contend the subsidies to insurers are fully authorized by federal law, and say the president’s position is reckless.“We are prepared to sue,” said California Attorney General Xavier Becerra. “We’ve taken the Trump Administration to court before and won.”Word of Trump’s plan came on a day when the president had also signed an executive order directing government agencies to design insurance plans that would offer lower premiums outside the requirements of President Barack Obama’s Affordable Care Act.Frustrated over setbacks in Congress, Trump is wielding his executive powers to bring the “repeal and replace” debate to a head. He appears to be following through on his vow to punish Democrats and insurers after the failure of GOP health care legislation.MORE: Trump’s health secretary resigns in travel flapOn Twitter, Trump has termed the payments to insurers a “bailout,” but it’s unclear if the president will get Democrats to negotiate by stopping payment.Experts have warned that cutting off the money would lead to a double-digit spike in premiums, on top of increases insurers already planned for next year. That would deliver another blow to markets around the country already fragile from insurers exiting and costs rising. Insurers, hospitals, doctors’ groups, state officials and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce have urged the administration to keep paying.Leading GOP lawmakers have also called for continuing the payments to insurers, at least temporarily, so constituents maintain access to health insurance. Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee Chairman Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., is working on such legislation with Democratic Sen. Patty Murray of Washington.The so-called “cost-sharing” subsidies defray copays and deductibles for people with low-to-modest incomes, and can reduce a deductible of $3,500 to a few hundred dollars. Assistance is available to consumers buying individual policies; people with employer coverage are unaffected by the dispute.Nearly 3 in 5 HealthCare.gov customers qualify for help, an estimated 6 million people or more. The annual cost to the government is currently about $7 billion.But the subsidies have been under a legal cloud because of a dispute over whether the Obama health care law properly approved them. Adding to the confusion, other parts of the Affordable Care Act clearly direct the government to reimburse the carriers.For example, the ACA requires insurers to help low-income consumers with their copays and deductibles.And the law also specifies that the government shall reimburse insurers for the cost-sharing assistance that they provide.MORE: President Donald Trump tours damage in Naples EstatesBut there’s disagreement over whether the law properly provided a congressional “appropriation,” similar to an instruction to pay. The Constitution says the government shall not spend money unless Congress appropriates it.House Republicans trying to thwart the ACA sued the Obama administration in federal court in Washington, arguing that the law lacked specific language appropriating the cost-sharing subsidies.A district court judge agreed with House Republicans, and the case has been on hold before the U.S. appeals court in Washington. Up to this point the Trump administration continued making the monthly payments, as the Obama administration had done.While the legal issue seems arcane, the impact on consumers would be real.The Congressional Budget Office estimated that premiums for a standard “silver” plan will increase by about 20 percent without the subsidies. Insurers can recover the cost-sharing money by raising premiums, since those are also subsidized by the ACA, and there’s no legal question about their appropriation.Consumers who receive tax credits under the ACA to pay their premiums would be shielded from those premium increases.But millions of others buy individual health care policies without any financial assistance from the government and could face prohibitive increases. Taxpayers would end up spending more to subsidize premiums. WASHINGTON (AP) In a brash move likely to roil insurance markets, President Donald Trump will “immediately” halt payments to insurers under the Obama-era health care law he has been trying to unravel for months.Before sunrise Friday morning, Trump went on Twitter to urge Democrats to make a deal: “The Democrats ObamaCare is imploding,” he wrote. “Massive subsidy payments to their pet insurance companies has stopped. Dems should call me to fix!”The Democrats ObamaCare is imploding. Massive subsidy payments to their pet insurance companies has stopped. Dems should call me to fix!— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) October 13, 2017 Do you see a typo or an error? Let us know. Author: Associated Press Trump to issue stop-payment order on health care subsidies Published: October 13, 2017 7:32 AM EDT Updated: October 14, 2017 6:02 PM EDT SHARElast_img read more

Posted in akidgsvmlsry

Wyclef Jean anuonnces his vote for the next Haitian President

first_imgA look at some of the top stories making the news today, June 29th, across your Caribbean-American community in South Florida.Here’s a look at our top stories.The first Zika-related microcephaly birth in Florida has confirmed by the Florida Department of Health. The mother, a Haitian national who came to Florida to give birth, was infected with Zika before arriving to Florida. There have been two other Zika-related microcephaly births in the U.S, one in Hawaii and one in New Jersey.Miami-Dade County Commissioners have passed an ordinance banning Styrofoam products from county parks and beaches beginning summer 2017. Styrofoam poses problems when the container, which is non-biodegradable and linked to cancer, breaks into smaller pieces and gets scattered throughout public spaces and neighboring bodies of water. Violators of the ordinance will incur at $50 fine.Jamaican – American rapper, Tyga has released a new single titled ‘1 of 1’  and it is being called a diss to Drake’s song ‘Controlla’. Mr. Vegas, a Jamaican dancehall artiste, who has called Drake ‘fake’ in a Facebook live video is sampled on Tyga’s single adding to the controversy.In Sports, for the N.A.S.L, the Fort Lauderdale Strikers will play Orlando City SC at the Camping World Stadium tonight at 7:30. After a 4-3 PK shootout win against D.C. United in the last round, this will be the first time in Strikers history that they have made it to the 5th round of the U.S Open Cup.Here’s a look at what’s Trending:International hip hop singer, Wyclef Jean, took to twitter announcing Jude Célestin has his vote to be the next President of Haiti! Celeste responded by thanking Wycleaf for his endorsement of his vision of a prosperous Haiti where opportunities will be available to all. Elections were cancelled earlier this month due to fraud and will be held again in October.For todays weather forecast:Scattered storms in Broward County with a high of 89 and a low of 76. Partly Cloudy in Miami-Dade, with a high of 89 and a low of 78.For more information on these and other stories, visit caribbeannationalweekly.com. Remember to pick up this week’s copy of our Caribbean National Weekly at your nearest Caribbean – American outlet.last_img read more

Posted in akidgsvmlsry

Negrense boxer Rosia to gun for flyweight belt

first_imgRenz Rosia NEGRENSE boxer Renz Rosia will be vying for the Philippine Boxing Federation (PBF) flyweight championship when he faces title holder Arnold Garde on June 28 at Maco Municipal Gym in Maco, Compostela Valley.The Cadiz City, Negros Occidental native is hoping to return to winning ways against Garde after losing three of his last four matches, all of which were championship bouts.Rosia’s last defeat was via majority decision at the hands of Philippine Visayas Professional Boxing Association super flyweight champion Ponciano Remandiman last April 5.Rosia’s two other title defeats were against Genesis Libranza for the Philippine Games and Amusements Board flyweight championship on October, 2018 and against Thai boxer Jakkrawut Majoogoen for OPBF silver super flyweight on April 2018. For Garde, this will be his first defense on the championship he won at the expense of Aries Buenavidez on June, 2018 at the same venue. He also lost three of his last four matches.The 30-year-old Rosia parades a 14-8-1 win-loss-draw ring record with seven stoppage wins, while the 29-year-old Garde has 10-7-3 boxing slate, including four knockout victories./PNlast_img read more

Posted in akidgsvmlsry

4.6 Earthquake Struck Southcentral Tonight

first_imgInitial reports from the USGS’s indicated the quake was felt in Kenai, Soldotna, Sterling and towards Anchorage. The 4.6 quake reported by the Alaska Earthquake Center — struck at 8:41pm. It was centered 8.3 miles east-northeast of Big Lake and struck at a depth of about 22 miles.center_img FacebookTwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享A 4.6 magnitude earthquake shook Southcentral Alaska Tuesday night, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.last_img

Posted in akidgsvmlsry

Tyson Fury Rumbles To Victory Against Otto Wallin In Las Vegas Showdown

first_imgTyson Fury battled to a rugged points win over Otto Wallin as he fought for over nine rounds with heavy cuts to maintain his unbeaten record in a dramatic bout in Las Vegas.The 31-year-old Briton, a 1-25 favourite with bookmakers, was expected to walk through Sweden’s Wallin but a deep wound above his right eye was repeatedly checked by the ringside doctor, prompting moments of stunned silence at the T-Mobile Arena.It was a punch in the third round that drew blood above the eye and Fury displayed greater urgency when officials began to show concern, switching from patient boxing to planting his feet in a bid to land heavy, destructive shots.A barrage in the ninth forced Wallin to sway, before a hard right hand piled him into the ropes in the 11th as Fury came through the type of examination few expected with a unanimous 116-112 117-111 118-110 points win.RelatedTyson Fury To Undergo Surgery After Nasty Cut Against Otto WallinSeptember 17, 2019In “Boxing”Boxing: Fury Dumps Coach As Wilder Bout LoomsDecember 15, 2019In “Boxing”Deontay Wilder Promises To Do More Damage To Reopen Tyson Fury’s Cuts When They Clash In FebruarySeptember 19, 2019In “Boxing”last_img read more

Posted in akidgsvmlsry

‘I created them’ – Bellefield coach Tomlin not worried about prodigies going astray

first_imgBellefield High School is known in track and field for its middle distance programme, especially having produced national 5,000m record holder Kemoy Campbell and now, promising Class Three runner Tavaughn Martin. However, like many other lesser prominent high schools in Jamaica, Bellefield’s athletes are constantly faced with offers to join the more financially endowed high school track and field programmes across the country. But head coach Dean Tomlin is not worried about these schools poaching his best youngsters. “One of the things about Bellefield athletes over the years is that I created them,” Tomlin said. “Once you create them, they give you that loyalty. They don’t normally want to leave. I think most of them look at Kemoy, and (Shevan) Parkes, and (Tameka) Brooks and all the successes over the years. Those past athletes usually come back and let them know that ‘look, you’re in one of the best middle distance programmes in the country. Leaving makes no sense.’” Tomlin said that although he was not worried about his athletes leaving, he still had to deal with the annoyance of recruiters talking to them privately to try to convince them to leave. “Can I tell you that coaches even come to my training sessions and talk to my athletes at times,” he said. “But one of the things that I always tell them is to let them (coaches) talk to me. Once they come into the presence of the coach, they’re not going to come any further. “It’s a strategy that I use. The loyalty that they developed for me, it’s like I’m a father figure to them. It’s not a programme with a lot of persons on the coaching staff. I’m the only person, so I’m like a father to them.” Martin is one of the favourites to take the Class Three boys’ 800m title in tomorrow’s final at 4:25 p.m.last_img read more