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Coronavirus loan scheme risks ‘wall of redundancies and defaults’

first_imgTuesday 7 April 2020 8:03 pm Alberto Thomas of Fideres said the slow pace of lending and the paltry sums so far disbursed would lead to massive job losses in the immediate future. James Booth “Unless you intervene and say to the banks ‘you must lend’ the banks will do as they choose and on the terms they set,” a law firm partner said. Another criticism of the scheme is that although the government will cover 80 per cent of the loans, the banks are still being asked to lend during a period of acute economic uncertainty and after being told by the Bank of England to stop paying dividends to protect their balance sheets. The failure of the coronavirus loan programme to help struggling small and medium-sized businesses risks triggering a “wall of redundancies and defaults” say critics. Last week, the scheme was overhauled after criticism that banks were trying to push borrowers towards alternative products, charge high rates of interest and ask for personal guarantees from directors. The coronavirus loan scheme is not getting cash to businesses fast enough critics say (Getty Images) Also Read: Coronavirus loan scheme risks ‘wall of redundancies and defaults’ say critics A spokesperson said: “We have been clear that we all must play our part in the national effort to support businesses and protect jobs. It provides for a loan of up to £5m from one of 40 accredited lenders for UK businesses with a turnover of less than £45m with the government covering the banks for 80 per cent of the loan. “The response to the government meddling in their business will be ‘You are going to shoot our liquidity to bits if you force us to lend to these zombie companies.’” They added. whatsapp Ad Unmute by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeBleacherBreaker4 Sisters Take The Same Picture For 40 Years. Don’t Cry When You See The Last One!BleacherBreakerUndoMisterStoryWoman Files For Divorce After Seeing This Photo – Can You See Why?MisterStoryUndobonvoyaged.comTotal Jerks: These Stars Are Horrible People.bonvoyaged.comUndoDefinition24 Of The Most Hilarious Yard Signs Ever WrittenDefinitionUndoNational Penny For Seniors7 Discounts Seniors Only Get If They AskNational Penny For SeniorsUndoDaily FunnyFemale Athlete Fails You Can’t Look Away FromDaily FunnyUndozenherald.comMeghan Markle Changed This Major Detail On Archies Birth Certificatezenherald.comUndoBeach RaiderMom Belly Keeps Growing, Doctor Sees Scan And Calls CopsBeach RaiderUndoNinjaJournalistThe Most Expensive Royal Weddings In Royals HistoryNinjaJournalistUndo “We’re working with the financial services sector to ensure that companies feel the full benefits from this support.” The Treasury said the chancellor was meeting with the heads of the banks this week to urge them to support small and medium-sized businesses. However, banks are still able to ask for guarantees from directors on loans for more than that amount, leaving directors with the possibility they will be personally on the hook if their business fails. More From Our Partners Police Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comUK teen died on school trip after teachers allegedly refused her pleasnypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.org A report from economic consultancy Fideres Partners said the monthly pay roll of the UK’s 6m small and medium-sized businesses amounted to £41bn. The coronavirus loan scheme is not getting cash to businesses fast enough critics say (Getty Images) center_img The coronavirus loan scheme is not getting cash to businesses fast enough critics say (Getty Images) Also Read: Coronavirus loan scheme risks ‘wall of redundancies and defaults’ say critics Share “I talked to one business where the bank was stipulating personal guarantees and they were considering whether the directors wanted to take the risk or to put the business into administration. My sense is that is not what the government was intending,” he said. The coronavirus business interruption loan scheme was introduced by chancellor Rishi Sunak last month to help funnel money to businesses hit by the economic freeze that has followed the coronavirus lockdown. The coronavirus loan scheme is not getting cash to businesses fast enough critics say (Getty Images) Also Read: Coronavirus loan scheme risks ‘wall of redundancies and defaults’ say critics However, City A.M. revealed today that UK Finance data showed banks had paid out just £291.9m to 2,022 businesses under the scheme, translating to an approval rate of just 0.65 per cent. Giles Murphy, a partner at accountancy firm Smith & Williamson, said directors could decide that winding up their business now was less of a risk than signing assets over to the bank further down the line. “That is why we’re taking unprecedented action and have announced £330bn in business loans and guarantees, paying 80 per cent of the wages of furloughed workers for three months, VAT and tax deferrals, introducing cash grants of up to £25,000 for small companies and covering the cost of statutory sick pay. Tags: Coronavirus “I don’t think we have seen the tip of the iceberg in terms of redundancies and bankruptcies,” he said. The coronavirus loan scheme is not getting cash to businesses fast enough critics say (Getty Images) Also Read: Coronavirus loan scheme risks ‘wall of redundancies and defaults’ say critics Show Comments ▼ whatsapp Thomas said the scheme is “slow and it is open to abuse by the banks” which as well as asking for guarantees have been reportedly quoting high rates of interest on the loans after the first year during which interest and fees will be covered by the state. However, Thomas said a full overhaul of the scheme was needed to avoid a catastrophic wave of business failures and job losses. The requirement for banks to first offer borrowers standard loan products before they could access the scheme was dropped in the shake-up and asking for personal guarantees for loans under £250,000 was banned. Coronavirus loan scheme risks ‘wall of redundancies and defaults’ say critics “You have a wall of redundancies and defaults coming which is immense,” he said. “You can pretty much count the days.”last_img read more

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Classic racing cars grace the city streets

first_img Show Comments ▼ Thursday 4 June 2015 9:33 pm Express KCS Classic racing cars grace the city streets City suits could rub shoulders, but perhaps not kick the tyres, in Dunster Court last night. Celebrations of the 92nd Anniversary of the Le Mans 24-hour race brought racing legends David Richards CBE, Ross Brawn OBE and John Surtees OBE for a French-inspired charity dinner and reception, where guests got up close with some of the famous Le Mans cars. Sharecenter_img whatsapp Read This Next’A Quiet Place Part II’ Sets Pandemic Record in Debut WeekendFamily ProofHiking Gadgets: Amazon Deals Perfect For Your Next AdventureFamily ProofIndian Spiced Vegetable Nuggets: Recipes Worth CookingFamily ProofAmazon roars for MGM’s lion, paying $8.45 billion for studio behind JamesFamily ProofHomemade Tomato Soup: Delicious Recipes Worth CookingFamily ProofCheese Crostini: Delicious Recipes Worth CookingFamily ProofWhat is ‘Ranked-Choice Voting,’ the New System for New York’s MayoralFamily ProofChicken Bao: Delicious Recipes Worth CookingFamily ProofYoga for Beginners: 3 Different Types of Yoga You Should TryFamily Proof whatsapp by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMaternity WeekA Letter From The Devil Written By A Possessed Nun In 1676 Has Been TranslatedMaternity WeekPost FunKate & Meghan Are Very Different Mothers, These Photos Prove ItPost FunInvestment GuruRemember Cote De Pablo? Take A Deep Breath Before You See Her NowInvestment GuruEquity MirrorThey Drained Niagara Falls — They Weren’t Prepared For This Sickening DiscoveryEquity MirrorTele Health DaveRemember Pierce Brosnan’s Wife? Take A Deep Breath Before You See What She Looks Like NowTele Health DaveTaonga: The Island FarmThe Most Relaxing Farm Game of 2021. No InstallTaonga: The Island FarmLivestlyThe Best Redhead Actresses, RankedLivestlyTotal PastThis Was Found Hiding In An Oil Painting – Take A Closer LookTotal PastNovelodgePierce Brosnan’s Wife Lost 120 Pounds – This Is Her NowNovelodge Tags: NULLlast_img read more

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Why don’t investors care about women on boards?

first_img More From Our Partners 980-foot skyscraper sways in China, prompting panic and evacuationsnypost.comWhite House Again Downplays Fourth Possible Coronvirus Checkvaluewalk.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgInstitutional Investors Turn To Options to Bet Against AMCvaluewalk.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.org “While these campaigns have achieved some progress, it is clear UK plc is still poorly diversified at senior management level,” she added. Hermes Investment management’s annual Responsible Capitalism survey found that only 23 per cent of institutional decision-makers said that they placed importance on gender diversity at the board level, despite recent efforts by the likes of Lord Davies to increase the number of women in high-level positions. Share “There have been a number of high-profile campaigns to improve diversity on boards, notably from groups such as the 30% Club.  whatsapp Why don’t investors care about women on boards? Monday 12 October 2015 8:47 pm whatsapp Less than a quarter of institutional investors have said that they believe gender diversity on management boards is important, according to a new survey out today. The Davies Review’s annual report for this year showed that the percentage of women in executive level positions has increased from 5.5 per cent to 8.6 per cent in the past five years. Commenting on the survey, Harriet Steel, head of business development at Hermes, said: “On the surface, the corporate world is making great strides in improving its record on diversity.” But she added: “The results are disappointing and show there is some way before the glass ceiling is cracked in the board room and on issues of pay.  by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikePost FunKate & Meghan Are Very Different Mothers, These Photos Prove ItPost FunSwift VerdictChrissy Metz, 39, Shows Off Massive Weight Loss In Fierce New PhotoSwift VerdictMaternity WeekA Letter From The Devil Written By A Possessed Nun In 1676 Has Been TranslatedMaternity Weekzenherald.comMeghan Markle Changed This Major Detail On Archies Birth Certificatezenherald.comEquity MirrorThey Drained Niagara Falls — They Weren’t Prepared For This Sickening DiscoveryEquity MirrorArticles SkillHusband Leaves Wife For Her Sister, Not Knowing She Won The Lottery Just Moments BeforeArticles SkillUnify Health LabsRandy Jackson: Activate Your Metabolism By Eating These 3 ThingsUnify Health LabsBlood Pressure For LifeWhy Doctors May No Longer Prescribe Blood Pressure MedsBlood Pressure For LifeDefinitionThe Most Famous Movie Filmed In Every U.S. StateDefinition Lauren Fedor Show Comments ▼ last_img read more

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Amicus presents positive data on Pompe drug, but could wait years for approval

first_img Amicus CEO John Crowley and daughter Megan, who has Pompe disease. Crowley family Unlock this article — plus daily coverage and analysis of the biotech sector — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED Biotech Senior Writer, Medicine, Editorial Director of Events Matthew covers medical innovation — both its promise and its perils. STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. What is it? About the Author Reprints Amicus presents positive data on Pompe drug, but could wait years for approval GET STARTED What’s included?center_img Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Matthew Herper By Matthew Herper Feb. 5, 2019 Reprints Amicus Therapeutics (FOLD) said Tuesday that its drug for Pompe disease appeared to benefit patients with the disease in a small trial, a modest but noteworthy milestone ahead of what will be a pivotal trial.“This is an important next step on what’s almost a 20-year journey,” said Amicus CEO John Crowley. @matthewherper Log In | Learn More [email protected] Tags biotechnologyrare diseaseSTAT+last_img read more

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In Pictures: Stradbally celebrates living in a rural town on St Patrick’s Day

first_imgHome News Community In Pictures: Stradbally celebrates living in a rural town on St Patrick’s… NewsCommunity GAA By Alan Hartnett – 17th March 2019 SEE ALSO – 22 useful pointers to help you get through St Patrick’s Day Facebook Here are all of Wednesday’s Laois GAA results WhatsApp 2020 U-15 ‘B’ glory for Ballyroan-Abbey following six point win over Killeshin Pinterest TAGSParadeSt Patrick’s Day 2019Stradbally Facebook Twittercenter_img Twitter Brought to you in association with Joe Mallon Motors, PortlaoiseThis was arguably the greatest turnout Stradbally has ever seen for its St Patrick’s Day parade.Hundreds lined Main Street as the Little Town turned green this morning as patrons arrived in their droves to march down the Main Street to celebrate St Patrick’s Day.This year’s parade, organised as always by Fr Sean Kelly with assistance from Rev Alec Purser, was themed a ‘celebration of living in a small rural community’.Community groups, clubs and organisations joined with local businesses to bring a real carnival atmosphere on this chilly morning.Starting on the Rathmore Road, the band from St Colman’s National School led the way with renditions of traditional songs followed by Cosby National School.The procession saw representations from Stradbally GAA, Stradbally Town AFC and many other groups.Liz Molloy and Austin Watt Clancy also had their own extra large photo frame and they captured some brilliant photos, some of which are below.The parade ended as everyone headed for the church for St Patrick’s Day mass before venturing to St Colman’s School for tea, cake and refreshments.Check out the best of the pictures below: Previous articleIn Pictures: Early starts as Vicarstown and Timahoe turn on the style againNext articleDonald Trump, The Greatest Showman and Superheros light up Abbeyleix parade Alan HartnettStradbally native Alan Hartnett is a graduate of Knockbeg College who has worked in the local and national media since 2008. Alan has a BA in Economics, Politics and Law and an MA in Journalism from DCU. His happiest moment was when Jody Dillon scored THAT goal in the Laois senior football final in 2016. WhatsApp Pinterest RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR In Pictures: Stradbally celebrates living in a rural town on St Patrick’s Day Kelly and Farrell lead the way as St Joseph’s claim 2020 U-15 glory GAA GAA last_img read more

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Defra issues reminder on new EU Animal Health Regulation

first_imgDefra issues reminder on new EU Animal Health Regulation Please note that the information in this page has been issued by Defra, not the Government Chemist, and it is published to increase dissemination amongst Government Chemist stakeholders.New Animal Health Regulation and composite rules apply from 21 April 2021Defra has issued a reminder that new EU Animal Health Regulation (AHR) and composite rules will apply from 21 April 2021.Five new Export Health Certificates (EHCs) and one private attestation can be used for exports of specific products of animal origin to the EU. This includes two new composite product EHCs and the private attestation document for products exempt from certification. The ECHs are on EHC online and the private attestation on form finder.The remaining new EHCs for live animals, germinal products and products of animal origin will be phased in over the coming months.If your composite product already requires an EHC, you will be able to carry on using the current EHC until August or choose to use the new documentation.If your product does not currently require an EHC, you must follow the new rules from today (21 April).For live animals, germinal products and other products of animal origin you will be able to continue using existing EHCs until August 2021.Heat treatmentThe European Commission has confirmed it is amending the AHR to allow businesses to use a private attestation to export shelf-stable composite products containing dairy (but no meat) that has not undergone UHT or sterilisation, so long as the dairy product originates and is processed in a third country listed for the export of dairy to the EU, such as GB. As the legislative amendments will not be in place by 21 April 2021 when the new Regulation applies the Commission has agreed an interim arrangement. There is further information in the guidance. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:animal, Commission, dairy, EU, Europe, european, Export, Government, health, heat, Internet, online, regulation, treatment, UK, UK Governmentlast_img read more

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5 new study abroad courses for summer 2021

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: Jan. 14, 2021 • By Education Abroad Are you interested in taking a CU Boulder course abroad this summer? Then consider a CU Education Abroad Global Seminar.These short-term programs are taught and directed by CU Boulder faculty members. They last between two and six weeks and provide a small-group experience that allows students to build strong connections with faculty and peers. Education Abroad offers more than 40 of these options, but check out a few of these new options for summer 2021.Ecuador – Expeditions & AdventureLAMS 3000: Travel, Science & Adventure 3 credits, 3 weeks Learn about the scientific expeditions of Darwin, La Condamine and Humboldt from a cultural perspective. Several of the most important scientific discoveries happened in Ecuador: the actual shape of the Earth was measured near Quito, the evidence of natural selection was found in the Galapagos Islands, & environmentalism was first inspired in Andean volcanoes. These expeditions changed global knowledge on astronomy, geography, and biology, and you will get to visit the Ecuadorian sites – including the Galapagos Islands!Croatia – International Business & ManagementINBU 3300: International Business & Management 3 credits, 2.5 weeks Learn the tools required to effectively manage the major challenges that globalization, changing world markets, & cultural differences demand in international business today. You’ll participate on multiple excursions all over the gorgeous island nation of Croatia. Embrace the Croatian culture & attend lectures at local universities while experiencing how critical the relationship between business & culture is by using a number of American companies in Croatia as case studies. Don’t miss the CU Summer Abroad Expo on Tuesday, Jan. 26.Sign Up Todaycenter_img Greece – The Athlete as a National SymbolETHN 3704: Nationhood, Nationalism, Sport 3 credits, 2.5 weeks You’ll examine sport in a global context by studying & viewing major international sporting events in Greece. Athens was the host city of the first modern-day Olympic Games, and as such, provides an ideal backdrop for the course. You will enjoy activities ranging from guided tours of Athens’ most famous spots, to an optional surfing class, & excursions to Olympia and Santorini.Norway – Identity, Arts & EthicsSCAN 3101: Identity, Arts and Ethics in Contemporary Norway 3 credits, 2 weeks Learn about Contemporary Norway through a multi-disciplinary lens & explore how the traditionally homogenous Norwegian culture has changed over the past 30 years, and how it is still changing today. You’ll discover the critical roles of art & nature in defining Norwegian identity, attend the Bergen International Music Festival, and take a train through the breathtaking countryside from Bergen to Oslo to experience the natural wonders that have shaped the Nordic identity.Hungary – War & MoralityPHIL 3290: War and Peace & the Enduring Struggle for Freedom 3 credits, 2.5 weeks You’ll learn about armed conflict & just war theory by exploring the historical sites of Budapest, once an epicenter of European politics, where revolutions sparked, wartime foreign policies were decided, and the memories of Hungarian leaders are honored. Visit the Count Dégenfeld castle hotel & vineyard to taste Hungarian wines & learn about the ethics of post-war usurpations of private properties. You’ll walk across the iconic 1848 bridge that first spanned the Danube River to connect the western hills of Buda with the eastern plains of Pest.Don’t delay! Summer application deadlines range from Feb. 1 to March 1, so submit your application as soon as you can, as these programs could fill up.Categories:AcademicsCampus Communitylast_img read more

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HUSH Symposium to Focus on Children with Disabilities

first_imgHUSH Symposium to Focus on Children with Disabilities CultureMay 13, 2014Written by: Shari-Ann Palmer RelatedTeachers Encouraged to Foster Positive Environment for Children FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail RelatedJamaicans Urged to Beautify the Land This Labour Day RelatedChildren’s Advocate Cautions Schools Against Protecting Sexual Predatorscenter_img Story HighlightsThe Institute of Jamaica (IOJ) will host its fourth HUSH Children’s Symposium on Wednesday, May 14 at the Rex Nettleford Hall Auditorium at UWI.The symposium themed: ‘Disability, Equality and Accessibility’ will focus on: learning disabilities, mental health, visual impairment and deaf culture.This year’s staging is being held in association with the Nathan Ebanks Foundation, a non-profit organisation that offers support to the disabled community. The Institute of Jamaica (IOJ) will host its fourth HUSH Children’s Symposium on Wednesday, May 14 at the Rex Nettleford Hall Auditorium at the University of the West Indies, Mona Campus.The symposium themed: ‘Disability, Equality and Accessibility’ will focus on: learning disabilities, mental health, visual impairment and deaf culture.The forum, which is an annual event, is part of the IOJ’s drive to change public perception toward persons living with disabilities, especially children.It also seeks to break the silence of children in addressing the various issues that affect them. This year’s staging is being held in association with the Nathan Ebanks Foundation, a non-profit organisation that offers support to the disabled community.Public Relations Officer at IOJ, Michka McCreath told JIS News that the inspiration for this year’s focus on children with disabilities came from the IOJ’s realisation that there is a need to focus on an area that will have significant national impact.Discussions between the IOJ’s Programmes Coordination Division and founder of the Nathan Ebanks Foundation, Christine Staple Ebanks, also influenced the area of focus.“A symposium on disabilities will definitely reach an audience that we have never captured before in this type of manner. We want people to understand that they (children with disabilities) are normal, they like to enjoy life, they are fun loving just like we are and we do not want them to feel different.  We want them to feel included in all of our activities and we want to make all the society a bit more inclusive…to them and their special needs,” said Miss McCreath.The symposium, she explained, will help to develop the potential of children, which is one of the core mandates of the Institute.“This is definitely the way forward in our vision because…we have a mandate to provide resources and information for children and children with disabilities are also under that umbrella and this is a way we have decided to get the information about their disabilities to a wider audience,” Miss McCreath expressed.Stakeholders in the education sector, including teachers and students are the main targets of the event because of their prolonged periods of interaction with children.Miss McCreath further noted that some teachers are unaware of the best methods of addressing the needs of students with disabilities, including how to tailor teaching material for this special group.“We are targeting students as well as those who are peers of children with disabilities so that they will understand how it is that they are to communicate with them so that they feel better appreciated,” informed the public relations officer.This year’s staging of the symposium will include participation from Minister of Youth and Culture, Hon. Lisa Hanna, along with several government and corporate entities including: the Ministry of Education, the Jamaica Council for Persons with Disabilities, the Child Development Agency, the Jamaica Association for Children with Learning Disabilities, the Mico University College’s Child Assessment and Research in Education (CARE) Centre, and the Jamaica Association for the Deaf. Advertisementslast_img read more

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Questions for the Bar president-elect candidates

first_img Jan 25, 2021 Top Stories Steve Davis and Gary LesserThe following questions were posed by the News to Bar president-elect candidates Steve Davis of Miami and Gary Lesser of West Palm Beach. Ballots for the election will be mailed or emailed around March 1, and must be returned no later than 11:59 p.m. March 22. Voters will have the option of voting online in lieu of returning their paper ballot.1. The pandemic dominated 2020 and is expected to continue well into the new year. What has the Bar learned and how can it continue to assist its members and the public during these difficult times? Steve Davis: The Bar has reacted well to the pandemic and keeps learning to improve. First, the Bar staff has kept providing service at the levels Florida lawyers need. Currently 80% of Bar staff works remotely. Second, all Board of Governors (BOG) meetings have been virtual since March. The BOG has worked hard during this time. The sections and committees have also functioned well with most only meeting virtually. According to a survey of section and committee chairs, most felt the section and committee work was done well virtually. While everyone would prefer in-person meetings, the virtual platform has enabled a great many to participate that did not do so before. The BOG approved moving the Fall Meeting to being totally virtual in the future. The 2020 Annual Convention was held virtually, and it broke attendance records. All these show that there is a place for the virtual platforms to supplement the in-person meetings and we will use this technology to help all of our members and to increase participation in the future.I do believe — as we see the isolation for our members during the pandemic — the Bar needs to make sure we are doing all we can to help our members succeed.The Bar created a special COVID-19 webpage that highlights important information and resources members need during this crisis. That webpage compiles information from all over the state as well as the information collected from the COVID-19 Pandemic Recovery Task Force lead by President-elect Mike Tanner.Gary Lesser: COVID was a wakeup call in so many ways. None of us were equipped to deal with the magnitude of a pandemic. There was a terrible loss of life, and many businesses — including many law firms — suffered significant losses of clients and income. I think the Bar “upped” its level of communication with our membership like never before. This needs to continue and expand. We should listen and provide open, direct communication with our members on a regular basis. We’ve developed incredible resources and tools to help lawyers in their everyday practice of law. I think we’ve learned that we were not up to speed on emerging and existent technology. This is an opportunity for us to help our members understand and use our amazing, free services and programs. With increased communication, we can help them access the tools they need to move forward with their practice.2. Other than the pandemic, what are the top three issues facing Florida lawyers and what can the Bar do to address them?Lesser: The biggest issue facing Florida’s lawyers is maintaining their practices and their livelihood. It’s been harder for small firms and solo practitioners, and now we have so called “qualified providers” (many continue to not register with the Bar) who compete with our lawyers who must follow ethics and other rules, unlike these other non-lawyer referral sources which are increasingly present, including a growing social media and internet presence. We should help level the playing field. We must better serve our members with practical help, articles, and services to facilitate networking, mentoring, technology, and other assistance. We already have these in place, and we need to increase member access to these services.Another big issue concerns is the disconnect some lawyers feel with respect to The Florida Bar. In the last contested election, despite very good candidates, only 18% of our membership voted. This should be a huge wakeup call that we need to take active steps to better engage our membership, making them more aware of the amazing free CLEs, tools, and programs to help with their everyday practice of law. We need to more actively collaborate with our amazing voluntary bar associations all over Florida to further connect and assist our members.Finally, lawyers are concerned about the future of the law, what will things look like in the years ahead, especially in terms of communication and technology. Unfortunately, some of the “guidance” provided is from a 30,000-foot perspective, not necessarily helpful to the everyday practice of law. We have a very active and forward-thinking Technology Committee, whose work should be directed to identifying what affordable law practice serving technologies can be brought to the most lawyers, and offering free or low-cost technology seminars to make sure that we best serve our lawyer members.Davis: The pandemic has applied a lot of pressure to all of us, making being a Florida lawyer challenging, and will forever impact the practice of law in Florida. I do not believe you can separate the effects of the pandemic, but I believe the three top issues facing Florida lawyers are:• Sustaining a thriving law practice — Florida lawyers consistently list that there are too many lawyers. In the environment today, there are also nonlawyer service providers. There is a Special Committee on the Delivery of Legal Services looking at possible rule changes that should be implemented. It is the Bar’s responsibility to advocate for our lawyers so they can successfully practice in the changing world. My priority is to defend the independent judgment of the lawyers so that Florida lawyers are representing Florida clients.• Professionalism ­— Pre-pandemic surveys showed this was a problem many Florida lawyers identified as impacting them. There are many professionalism programs and initiatives, but the Bar needs to devote more resources to programs such as Proactive Management Based Regulation (PMBR). PMBR is a way we can help our members, protect the public, and advance professionalism.• Mental Health/Isolation — No one likes the pandemic, and it has led to isolation and stressed mental health for everyone. Unfortunately, the pandemic remains and this problem will only increase. The Florida Lawyers Helpline is an available, and to date, underutilized resource that members should freely use.3. How can the Bar better work with the Executive and Legislative Branches of government to support the Judicial Branch and achieve its goal of a timely, fair, and impartial judiciary? Davis: The Florida Bar has significant restrictions on its political activities. The Bar is funded by mandatory fees from our members. The U.S. Supreme Court in Keller v. State Bar of California, 496 U.S. 1 (1990), held that lawyers can be required to join a bar association so long as the bar limits its activities to “regulating the legal profession” and improving the “quality of legal services.” That means The Florida Bar — which spends more than half of our money on lawyer regulation — must be disciplined on any political activities. The Florida Bar has done well in restricting its political activities to avoid matters that would be divisive among our members. Accordingly, the Bar must be an objective and consistent advocate for Court funding, providing accurate detailed information to make sure the Judicial Branch gets the necessary funding, but cannot be partisan or advancing any political agenda. The Bar will work well with the Executive and Legislative branches by being a credible, authoritative, and accurate source on the needs of the judicial branch.Lesser: This is where the Bar has excelled for many years. As Legislation Chair, serving three different Bar Presidents, I worked with leadership to safeguard our independent and properly funded judiciary. This included ensuring the independent legal profession free from outside regulation. I learned a great deal working on these issues for many years. First, like most things in life, it’s about relationships, and building on those relationships to reinforce why the independent judiciary is the bedrock of our system of government. I believe we’ve done this well with the Legislative Branch, and I have worked many years with the leadership in both parties and both houses. But the old adage rings true — today’s success is tomorrow’s challenge. This is an ongoing effort and heavy lift. As Bar leaders engage more with lawmakers, we try to grow that open line of communication.We have worked tirelessly with the Executive Branch, and there are issues where we would like more agreement, most notably on the JNC process and the importance of funding civil legal assistance programs, which have been proven to financially benefit Florida taxpayers. There are opportunities for us to engage more and maintain a good line of communication.An impartial judiciary is the bedrock of a healthy functioning democracy, and citizens must have access to justice (this is made even more clear in the age of COVID). The judicial branch receives an extremely small percentage of our state budget. We must ensure that our court system has the proper funds to serve citizens and business with enough judges and robust technological infrastructure. This is vital to our work and supports everything we do for the legal profession and citizens of Florida.4. Are the Bar’s diversity and inclusion, health and wellness, and increasing professionalism efforts making a difference? Lesser: As to diversity and inclusion efforts, the short answer is “yes, but we need to do more.” I think society was way behind (understatement) on addressing these issues. But I believe the Bar was ahead of the curve. We must keep the momentum to achieve real diversity in committee appointments, leadership, and the judiciary. In my 22 years of Bar involvement, the Leadership Academy is one of the best things implemented, and we should expand and strengthen it. The success speaks for itself in terms of its alumni who serve as Bar leaders, on Bar committees, and the Board of Governors, and many members of the judiciary. But we need more than slogans. Our active Diversity and Inclusion Committee, and their great work should be evaluated, strengthened, and supported. We should connect with the programs at voluntary bars, law schools, and elsewhere to improve and increase our efforts.On mental-health issues, I think the Bar is a national leader. We were early in addressing the unique mental-health issues of the legal profession. Kudos to Presidents Michael Higer and Dori Foster-Morales for making this issue a visible priority. I also thank and acknowledge the Young Lawyers Division for its significant, meaningful work with surveys, webinars, and especially the outstanding #StigmaFreeYLD program.The Bar has always excelled at professionalism programs, messaging, and services, so we lawyers are our “best selves” in the practice of law. “Pro Tip Tuesday” is one of the many great programs and initiatives of the award-winning Henry Latimer Center for Professionalism. It’s a vital tool for Florida lawyers.Davis: The Bar’s efforts are making a difference, but the Bar must remain vigilant in these issues. This year we saw social justice issues tell all of us that the work on diversity and inclusion must be a fundamental core of everything the Bar does. The focus should be on inclusion — so that diverse voices have real input on all Bar activities. Programs such as the #YLDisME is an example of how the Bar should approach these items.Health and wellness initiatives efforts have brought awareness for all Florida lawyers to take care of themselves. The YLD’s #StigmaFreeYLD provided examples that seeking help is a positive step. In May 2020, we launched the Florida Lawyers Helpline to provide an available resource lawyers in need can use. The Bar will build on these programs.Professionalism — the Bar has many excellent professionalism programs that should be reviewed to make sure we are focusing resources in the right areas. The Bar should evaluate PMBR programs to make sure we are reaching the lawyers who are in most need of support. 5. What drew you to Bar work?Davis: I love being a lawyer and have always cared about how the profession works. I started with committees and enjoyed working with lawyers who also love the profession. I then worked my way through leadership in the Dade County Bar, working from committee chair to board member and to ultimately become president. Nothing is better than working with the lawyers and judges who lead our profession. Collaborating with these leaders gives one a very encouraging and optimistic view of our profession. That view has only expanded as I have served on the BOG since 2013 and the BOG’s Executive Committee since 2016. There are many great lawyers, judges, and justices in this state who I have had the privilege of working with these past eight years.Lesser: I was very lucky. I was very involved with The Palm Beach County Bar Association and enjoyed that work, especially on professionalism issues. My mentor at the time, Bar President Tod Aronovitz, strongly encouraged me to apply for my first committee appointment over 22 years ago. He encouraged me to seek to become chair of the Professional Ethics Committee. He was one of the people who encouraged me to run for the Board of Governors almost 11 years ago. By that time, I was hooked. I liked the policy work, helping lawyers and the legal profession. I enjoyed interacting with and learning from my fellow committee members. I highly recommend Florida Bar committee involvement.6. What advice would you give to a recent Bar admittee, fresh out of law school and just sworn-in? Lesser: As much as many things have changed over the years, some basic advice remains the same: “Work hard, ask for advice, and get involved with the community.” You can make a difference right away as a new lawyer with your involvement and build relationships that will carry you forward on your journey. It’s a long, rewarding path.Davis: I think the most important advice is to make sure you become a good lawyer. Try to find someone — whether a boss or an experienced lawyer — to mentor you. I also think a new lawyer should avail herself of the many resources The Florida Bar offers. There are 74 committees, 22 sections, and two divisions. As a new admittee, the lawyer will automatically be a member of the Young Lawyers Division. There are a multitude of resources from LegalFuel, to Professionalism, to resources in technology, marketing, finance, and other aspects of practice management. It is worth spending time identifying meaningful resources based on the lawyer’s interest and needs. It is also worth checking out the local voluntary bar associations in the lawyer’s community. There are literally dozens of options a new lawyer should consider.7. What made you want to be a lawyer? Davis: I always looked up to lawyers. I was the first person in my family to go to college, and the work lawyers do in helping people, dealing with complex issues and fighting for clients, is a noble calling. What greater role can one serve than protecting legal rights? Law is fascinating, fulfilling, and rewarding. I have been fortunate to try many cases — jury and non-jury and argued appeals — and I can think of no other profession to offer such great challenges and rewards.Lesser: I had a few people in my life who really directed me to the practice of law. My parents were always supportive, my father telling me that working hard will help me with whatever I wanted to do, and my mother teaching me the importance of helping others through her community involvement and leadership. But my biggest influence was my grandfather, who I spent a lot of time with growing up. He started our firm in 1927 as a solo practitioner, and he really did what they now call “door law.” He often represented clients for little or no fee, sometimes being paid in corn or other agriculture. He firmly believed the lawyer had an obligation to help the client and the community. He had a positive, warm, and sincere way about him. He was my first role model and I hoped to grow up to be like him and practice law. But kids don’t compute mortality of their grandparents, so I missed him by 10 years. I believed then — and still believe now — that lawyers can make a unique difference with their clients and their community.8. Tell us about one defining moment in your legal career when you stopped to say, “I am proud to be a lawyer.” Lesser: I was a young lawyer, and referred a tragic case involving a 15-year-old killed in a car accident. The parents hired a lawyer who had secured what appeared to be the only recovery which was limited, and then stopped communicating with the clients, which I thought was terrible. I called and wrote the lawyer asking him to speak with the clients or advise where things stood with the case. No response. I told the clients that they had a right to know the outcome of their case and that I would move it forward even if any additional recovery was not certain or even possible. Over a year later, a few days before trial, we resolved the case financially, but more so the clients were relieved to have answers and a resolution of their deceased daughter’s case. That was almost 20 years ago and I am still in touch with the parents to this day.Davis: From 1998-2001, while a partner at a 10-person law firm, we were representing the State of Florida in an antitrust case on behalf of Florida citizens. As such, I was appointed a special assistant attorney general. The case was tried in the Middle District of Florida before Judge Harvey Schlesinger. I lived in Jacksonville for three months and was one of the lead trial lawyers in the courtroom every day for seven weeks until the case ultimately settled. The case was vigorously contested with excellent lawyers on both sides advancing sophisticated legal arguments. The case resolved through Judge Schlesinger persistently trying to bring the litigants together. I was proud to have participated in a case where we benefited Florida consumers, while working non-stop for months. I saw great lawyering, before an outstanding judge, obtaining an excellent result. It was a privilege for me at every professional level. Questions for the Bar president-elect candidateslast_img read more

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First annual ClimateFest hopes to engage and educate public

first_imgHomeNewsFirst annual ClimateFest hopes to engage and educate public Apr. 30, 2018 at 5:00 amNewsFirst annual ClimateFest hopes to engage and educate publicAngel Carreras3 years agodaily pressNewsSanta Monicasanta monica daily presssanta monica news The phrase “climate change” conjures many thoughts and feelings: tragic, irreversible, even a man-made hoax. Whatever your beliefs may be, “fun” is probably the last word that comes to mind on the subject. Climate Action Santa Monica (CASM) looks to change that with an intertwining of education, engagement, and yes, even fun with climate issues in their first annual ClimateFest. Co-produced by the City of Santa Monica in partnership with CASM, ClimateFest is billed as “an all-day community engagement event geared for adults and children” via the local grassroots organization’s website.Katharine King, a CASM co-chair, said the goal of the event is to attract someone who may not be active or even aware of climate change and to educate them in an engaging way. The festival approach was a carefully orchestrated idea, meant to counteract the “doom and gloom” narrative often attached to climate change.“We know ‘fun’ and climate issues don’t necessarily go in the same sentence,” King said in a phone call to the Daily Press. “It’s a bit of an experiment, but we want to get more people interested in climate issues and even sustainability. We wanted to offer fun ways to change a few habits here and there that benefit themselves and earth.” While the fest has the usual climate-talk suspects such as panels and keynote speakers (including Felicia Marcus, Chair of the California Water Boards), it’ll also consist of upcycling workshops (turning unused or old shirts into tote bags is one event), composting in urban environment workshops, information booths, rock climbing, a bicycle hub (tune-ups, safety check, and a skills course), music from DJ Derek Rath, and raffles and prizes.“We want it to be more accessible than anything we’ve ever produced,” King said. “We hope with this festival, we’ve given it enough different elements and different activities so people can personalize their experience.” Although the event isn’t until May 19, King suggests planning ahead, as you would any other festival. The quantity of activities to do, she said, allows people of all ages and interests to find a day’s worth of engaging options for them. “We want people to follow their own experiences and passions to make the most of their day,” she said. “There’s something for everybody, which is boring to say, but it’s true.”ClimateFest takes place May 19 at St. Monica’s Catholic Community Campus. The event is free, though registration is requested and required to receive free raffle and meal tickets. Walking and biking to the event are encouraged, with valet bike parking available. Registrations can be made at [email protected] Tags :daily pressNewsSanta Monicasanta monica daily presssanta monica newsshare on Facebookshare on Twitteradd a commentMay workshops in MalibuKBUGYou Might Also LikeFeaturedNewsBobadilla rejects Santa Monica City Manager positionMatthew Hall10 hours agoNewsWedding boom is on in the US as vendors scramble to keep upAssociated Press21 hours agoNewsCouncil picks new City ManagerBrennon Dixson21 hours agoFeaturedNewsProtesting parents and Snapchat remain in disagreement over child protection policiesClara Harter21 hours agoFeaturedNewsDowntown grocery to become mixed use developmenteditor21 hours agoNewsBruised but unbowed, meme stock investors are back for moreAssociated Press21 hours agolast_img read more